Client paces up and down the hallway. What can the care staff do to provide an environment that meets his needs?

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Just a thought: I'm a pacer with nervous energy. Just something I do along with "piddling." I just need to keep busy, but I don't see it as a problem, tho sometimes it makes those around me uncomfortable :) The staff at Dad's facility tries to help patients with whatever makes them comfortable. One day they gave one of the patients a broom bc she wanted to sweep the floor, & she was so happy. They also let her 'help' set the tables at mealtimes. Another carries a briefcase & continually asks about 'the data,' so the aides respond to him that they're working on it or that they will call his secretary. And they let him spread all sorts of papers on the table as he works on his 'reports.'
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One thing you can do is to put some though into finding something else that might occupy them. I was sitting with my mom in the NH today and feeling despair at the total lack of entertainment for the people living there, if I had to be in a place with nothing to do but stare at the walls I would pace too :(
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Seems like your an employee. Great that you care. I would check with the administrator to see if you and other staff members can go to a seminar that has to do with Dementia/Alzhemiers.
People with Dementia tend to be "itchy". They can't sit for long periods. Where my Mom is the ones that tend to fall are in wheelchairs and allowed to move around.
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I might discuss the pacing with his doctor. This type of behavior is common, from what I have read in people who have dementia. My LO paces in her wheelchair. She goes up and down the halls, often as if looking for someone. It could also be nervous energy. I used to think that perhaps she was doing it due to not being engaged with other activities, but, I discovered that she would chose to do that, even when I was sitting next to her trying to engage her with loving words, music and activities. After a few minutes, she preferred the pacing in her wheelchair. We have discussed it with her geriatric psychiatrist. It's good that she gets the exercise, but, I worry if she is anxious. Medication has seemed to help.
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Jewjew, when it comes to someone having alzheimer's/dementia, as per your profile, it depends on what stage that person is in as to what type of environment that person needs.

Is your client living at home? Or in Memory Care?

Back when my Mom had advanced dementia, there wasn't anything I nor the long-term-care facility could do except make her as comfortable as possible. Mom was unable to participate in any type of activity. Once in awhile she would enjoy music.
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