I changed Mom's bath time and confusion set in. Any advice?

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My mom has short term Dementia. I changed her bath time to night time before bed and she gets all confused and wants to know what time it is. I'm more confused than she is?

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Try your local Senior Center to see what activities thay may have. She needs more socialization and that may help. Even if she doesn't interact that much, just getting out may help. Being alone and confused can accentuate the sense of isolation and decline.

Just going out for a dairy queen treat, or taking a short walk if she's able will be good therapy. If she likes animals, find a dog park you can visit.

I also wouldn't change any routines, especially something which can be as traumatic to an elder as bathing, and especially in the evening when she might be sundowning.

There are memory specific activities offered by some day care centers. The one which hosted a seminar I attended had some, but I don't know what they were. You might try googling "memory care", or "memory activities" or similar terms to see if you can find some you can start.

There are also large piece jigsaw puzzles which might help stimulate her memory. I bought some at a children's bookstore. Or try crossword puzzles. Even though there's declining memory, sometimes crossword puzzles from the magazines Reminisce and Reminisce Extra will spark a light as they focus on activities from the era our parents grew up in.

Since she does read the paper, perhaps after she does you could read the articles then attempt to initiate a conversation. Even if she doesn't remember, just the interaction will be helpful for her.
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ba8alou, She is taking an antidepressant and that was why I thought she was sleeping more during the day. The antidepressant has worked some. We could take her to a Geriatric Physician but the medications are so expensive that she doesn't have part d on Medicare until Oct. enrollment. She never got it when she retired so she has to pay a penalty for over 15 years of not having it. And she doesn't have any money but a small SS check.
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Have you considered taking her to a geriatric doctor, or a geriatric neurologist for a workup? She could probably be helped by an antidepressant; she might benefit from attending adult day care with more opportunities for socialization. And don't forget you! Take care of yourself!
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Thanks ba8alou, I've been calling it Dementia because I'm just not sure what it is. She hasn't been officially diagnosed but the Dr. calls it Short Term Dementia. She is 90 years old and has for the last couple years now been forgetting almost everything you talk about or do that day. Her social interaction with people has dramatically declined. And when she talks to her other daughter she tells her the same thing over and over within 10 or 15 minutes. I , the daughter she never liked is her full time Caregiver. She sits a lot and reads the paper but can't tell you what she's read 10 minutes later. But anyone she talks to for a little bit of a time really doesn't see this. It's only me. Now she is beginning to sleep alot during the day. She is confused and depressed that she can't remember daily things. She seems to lose her day if I change any routine. Things are changing slowly as her brain is slowly dying. I realize that but still stressful. I want to see a Mom who was totally active, playing 25 Bingo cards at a time 5 days a week to someone who can't remember what she read in the paper 10 minutes ago.
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I'm not sure what you mean by short term dementia! Had you been bathing her in the AM? People with dementia thrive on schedules and routines (think of little kids, who are the same way). You may need to talk her through her new bath time for a long time, with patience and understanding.
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