How do you change from a regular physician to a geriatric specialist?

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I am an 83 year old woman--alert and in fairly good health . I am active socially and
physically.
I would like to transfer to a geriatrician. I live in Hewlett, L.I. 11557.Is there anyone
relatively near me?
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If you are able to speak with her health insurance rep, call them. Mom has a social worker/case worker with People's Health who checks in on her by phone about 1x or 2x/month. (FIRST, ASK IF A REFERRAL IS REQUIRED TO SEE A SPECIALIST.) They are ENCOURAGING Mom to get these tests run, and you can tell her that it is a requirement (sorry, but you have to learn to resort to little white lies when you reach a certain point). She's seeing a pediatrician? What in the world for? Tell her dr that you need a referral to a geriatric dr or neurologist; ANYTHING but the current status quo would be an improvement, I'm sure! I'm sorry, but I'm a cancer survivor and you HAVE to be choosy about doctors and take charge, sometimes to the point of appearing "pushy." I always ask, "If this was YOUR Mom, what would you do?" They are being PAID to care for your mother and if you have information about a decline in her health--mental or physical--and those concerns are outside of her current dr's ability to address, find another one ASAP and don't look back. If there are any signs of dementia, you may not have a lot of time to waste. For more detailed information, contact your local Alzheimer's Assn, even tho' she hasn't been diagnosed with it. Their organization (at least in MY city) has a wealth of information on ANY type of disease associated with memory loss. They have been, by far, the most competent and compassionate people I've encountered on my journey with Mom.
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I need a physician for a 65 year old lady who lives in Burnsville, nc
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I need to find a physician who specializes in care for women age 65.
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Since my mother had a stroke, she is aware that in her words "her brain won't work right". We found a doctor whose specialty is geriatrics and told her he was going to try to help her memory. She went along with it, started taking aricept and she even let him take blood to check her thyroid and B12 levels (I had told her it was just a new patient visit and I wouldn't let him do anything to her that she didn't want done). With Mom it's all in how it's presented to her and of course going out to eat afterward. So far I am very happy with her new doctor, I liked her old doctor as well, but a specialist just understands and looks at her situation differently. Wish you the best!
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Can you just tell her that she is seeing a "specialist?" There is no harm in having more than one doc and that way she will not think she is being "disloyal" to her longtime doc.
I had the same thing happen a few years ago. Mom was seeing doctor who was competent, but her office was clearly geared to younger, "healthier" patients. So I found a gerontologist and switched. He was much better and had more patience with the elderly.
I do not know why people stick with a doc who isn't doing his or her job. Choosing a doctor is no different than choosing an auto mechanic. If you are not getting good service, move on to a new one.
good luck
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Although mom is not diagnosed with Alzheimer's, she has the symptoms and her doctor will not discuss med to help her. He is a pediatrician and also in administration. She has gone to him for years and we need advice on how to present the new changes to her.
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