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My mother made me her agent in her DPOA. Knowing she has dementia, a couple of years ago her attorney addressed the possible need of a future guardianship - to which my mother wanted my sister and I to share in the guardianship responsibilities. This leaves out of the equation 2 other siblings - one of which has done little if anything for my mother and my brother likes to play martyr by saying he's taking care of Mom. When in fact, he's in debt to her and The reason I know this is because my mother told me about it and asked for help. Just need to know what I will be up against when mom's attorney gets the guardianship paperwork together. I know there will be opposition. What do I need to do to get prepared for battle? Oh and I can say that the other two siblings are very superficial and focused on my mom "stuff" - to which I feel that if I need to sell moms stuff to pay for the best care for her, I will. I could care less if there is anything leftover for anyone to inherit.

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Thanks. That's what I thought. My sister is an RN and I have 20 years of banking, degrees in Econ and finance. Good credit. 2 income household and have NEVER asked my mother for a dime. My husband and I pay for everything for her. The two other siblings have no medical or money handling background and one is in debted to her for thousands of dollars. Z
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Judges will appoint ONE person to be responsible for the estate and one to be responsible for the person. However, they do not appoint two people to be responsible for both items. Someone with a medical background would be ideal for the "person" and someone good with financial reports to handle the "estate". The candidate for either one must have good credit, good employment history, and be fingerprinted and background checked. The judge takes a very dim view of anyone who borrowed money or cars or houses. They hate to see DUI's, bad loans or even unpaid parking tickets. Mom has a say in things, if she tells the court evaluator she likes A and B but not C and D, it goes into the report.
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