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My father wants a cell phone and I'm wondering if someone can recommend one that would work for Alzheimer's patient who is almost deaf too. He has a hard time with all phones so there's that as well.

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My husband also has problems using the phone. We have a cell phone, but it's rare that he can find his daughters' names in the Contacts and he won't type in their numbers and touch call, either. I'm wondering about the phones that are voice activated. I had a coworker with one but didn't know the brand (we had no need of one then). Is that what Jitterbug has? He needs one that will respond to "call Tony" or "call Mary", for example. I'm with him almost all the time, but often he's impulsive and wants to call *now* and not wait an hour while I get some respite downstairs at BINGO, for example.
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Our memory care advised us against getting a phone. Once the memory goes, the elder will call at all hours. Then hang up, see the phone in his hand, and call again. Not worth it.
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Tinkerbell, why not take him to an Apple store and let him play with the gizmos there? It'll give you a clearer idea of whether there is any prospect of his ever being able to handle a cellphone, and it'll either be fun for him or give him a juicy grievance about the evils of fancy modern technology. Worse ways to spend an afternoon out, perhaps?
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Thanks for all your answers. Sunny girl, I don't leave my dad alone at his house. I stay with him there during the day, & we return to my house in late afternoon.He is never on his own. I'm retired, by the way, so no problem there, although my husband would like me to be at our house more.
I tried to get dad interested in a wearable alert but since he doesn't think there's anything wrong with him, well, you can guess his answer. He does have a landline & has trouble using it.
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Tinkerbell,
I read your profile. Is your dad still staying by himself during the day at this own house? If so, he may be saying he needs the phone due to feeling scared and wanting a lifeline for help. With dementia, the patient sometimes have odd sensations, confusion and anxiety.

Does he have a landline phone at his house where he stays during the day? If not, I'd try to get him an Emergency Alert Button that he can press for emergencies, keeping in mind that often with dementia patients they FORGET to press the button. Some fall down and remain on the floor for hours, because they just don't have the thought process to call for help or use the phone.

I'd try to consider why he really wants the cell and then go with something that he may be more likely to use. People with dementia, aren't able to learn new gadgets and they are also likely to misplace it a lot. That can frustrate them. But, if the funds are available, you can give it a try.
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Elderly people are curious about technology but faced with a cell phone, even a basic one with no bells or whistles, they become frustrated and don't know how to use it even though they've been taught. It's that curiosity that encourages families to get their loved one a cell phone in the first place without really understanding that if mom/dad/grandma/grandpa can't use the remote to the TV they're not likely to be able to use a cell phone.
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Tinkerbell, I'm afraid it would just frustrate him. If you can get one without a commitment for so many months it might be worth a try just to satisfy his request, but I wouldn't count on it being very useful. If Dad has not used a cell phone before, now is not a good time to start!

I got a jitterbug for my husband. It is very simple to use, but it was hard for him to learn. Each time he went out with it I made sure it was on. I reviewed how he would call me if he wanted to. I had him try it while he was still home. It was quite useful, even if he didn't use except in those circumstances. Our conversations went like this: I'd dial his number. I knew it took him a while to get it out of his pocket so I'll dial as many times as it took
me "Did you get a good haircut."
him "Yes."
me "It is taking a little longer than I expected. Did you have to wait a long time?"
him "No. I decided to stop for an ice cream cone on the way home. I'm on my way now."
me "Okay. I'll see you soon."

He never used it at home and he never called anyone but me or got calls from anyone else. In that limited context and with instructions and practice every single time he went out, it was worth the monthly fee for us.
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It would only frustrate him. Some have tried jitterbug, I think, that is designed with the elderly in mind. Supposed to be relatively simple to use.
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