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Amlodipine for blood pressure caused my mom's. Recently, it was a UTI
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My mom. Amlodipine for blood pressure caused auditory hallucinations. Recently, UTI caused them
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My father is 90 and lives with me. At night he hears people jumping my fence and they talk outside his bedroom, bang on the walls and keep him awake at night. Although he says he has seen them, I've been able to narrow down that he only hears them only at night. Sometimes I hear him walk outside. According to him when they see him they quiet down. I love that he's here with me but I have a difficult time with his stories about these people, because I know he's hallucinating. He's otherwise so intelligent and can do so much, and does help me around the house with repairs. He thinks these people sleep in my neighbors back yards. He's very healthy just losing his hearing. I welcome advice.
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P.S. to Grace48. I forgot to mention that she "does" take Zyprexa every night, which has helped a great deal.
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In response to Grace48, after MANY sleepless nights and frustrating days, I have come to embrace the fact that it is all part of her dementia. Some days are good and some not so good. What I have found is that sleep is absolutely VITAL. The lack of triggers her paranoia, hearing voices, singing, noises, people talking about and threatening to harm her. So, I do all that I can to ensure she gets a good night's rest, which "could" entail 12 to 14 hours. Every day brings something new, but it certainly beats the alternative.
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Grace48. Did you find an answer to your mothers hearing people. My mom has done this occasionally usually UTI.
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Hi: My mother in-law is 93 and is beginning to show signs of memory loss and difficulty with generational relationships and orientation to day/date, but responds well to cuing and acknowledges the problem and asks for help.

For the past 5-8 years she has had auditory hallucinations with complete dramatic scenarios like a soap opera. She heard the voices during the night and during the day and would ask us during visits whether we heard them. She was sure she could hear the drama with the family across the street through her closed windows. At 90, she chose to sell her home and move to independent living in a continuuing care community and left the family behind. Over the last two years, she has acquired another family in the apartment above her apartment. She has been willing to talk with her neurologist (acquired during her one and only seizure 11 years ago) and her PCP about this "experience" and is on a low dose of aricept.

Until recently she has refused to see a psychiatrist, but she is getting more and more irritated by the cast of characters. She also has a fixed delusion that something is wrong with her son (my husband) and has woken me in the middle of the night on my cell to tell me that she is dressed and ready to go visit him in the hospital. She is aware that it is night, but believes that he is in such dire condition we should go to the hospital NOW.

She will sometimes acknowledge that these "experiences" happen when she wakes up during the night or from a short daytime snooze that these are "dreams", but then recount them as if they are real.
Otherwise she is good health, walks a mile almost daily, eats well, no signs of sleep deprivation, she has many people that she spends time with, she attends classes, etc. daily and has an involved and supportive family.

We have told her that these episodes are caused by changes in her brain and that
these "episodes" are very real to her, but we do not hear what she is hearing. She is very smart and well-educated and has been given more technical explanations by her doctors.

We are trying to get her an appointment with a geripsychiatrist, but four have refused her as a patient for a variety of reasons. I have moved to the fifth on my list.

Any comments out there
Grace
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Sorry - it appears that my D is not working properly - both of those hear's should be heard. :0)
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I realize this thread is old - but I ran across this info while researching a problem my mother in law has with hearing music. She hasn't complained of it in recent months, but for a while, she would swear she hear a mens choir or quartet singing the Star Spangled Banner - it was always the same song and usually in the very early hours of the morning. I had never hear of auditory hallucinations before and have found that they do not always signify something very wrong.
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Thank you and happy holidays Dragonflower. She does take Zypreza, which does seem to help greatly. However, when she does not achieve enough sleep during the night, nothing stops the hallucinations. Right now, I am grateful for the combination, so "I" can sleep :) .
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I meant 3 letter.
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There is also a complication called "musical ear" . It has a 2 letter discription...like MES or something. It can be cause by severe hearing loss. My mom has it at times....it followed severe tinnitis. (sp) ringing in ears for years.
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Speaking as an R.N. here.....hallucinations are NEVER normal. Yes, they can be caused by pernicious anemia, sleep deprivation, schizophrenia, Alzheimer's, or any other host of physiological ailments. However, it is possible that she has developed some kind of "late-onset" schizophrenia variant related to the general deterioration of the brain and less efficient neurotransmitter activity of advanced age. The nature and pattern of her hallucinations reminds me a lot of the ones I used to see in my former psychiatric patients. If it were my elderly parent, I might consider trying a pediatric-dose of an antipsychotic medication to see if it would reduce the frequency or intensity of the hallucinations. Meanwhile, I would suggest keeping a journal of her symptoms......a daily log noting what was eaten, or any unusual events that occurred just prior to the onset of the hallucinations. There may be a "pattern" to them that will point towards their etiology.
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Thank you "Onward". I find that her symptoms increase dramatically when she does not sleep well and for at least 8-10 hours. There is NO telling her that the voices do not exist and paranoia causes great fear in her. At "98", you are most fortunate that your mom is "all there" apart from these episodes. Many blessings to you and your family for a happy and healthy holiday season.
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My mother,98, has 3-monthly injections for pernicious anaemia. Could there be a connection between her auditory hallucinations and the time just before and just after these injections? She hears the same voice singing songs against her and also berating her for the nasty things she had done to this woman long ago and that "she" ' would get her yet' for being so bad. She tries to cancel the voice by singing in her head a nice song herself, but now thinks that because she can sing to herself at the same time as this voice is talking to her, the voice must be real because as she puts it, 'I can't sing one song while listening to another, so the voice must be coming from outside'.She is convinced it is real and just 'humours us' when she says she is fine again. Believe me, she is all there mentally apart from this.
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My mother,98, has 3-monthly injections for pernicious anaemia. Could there be a connection between her auditory hallucinations and the time just before and just after these injections? She hears the same voice singing songs against her and also berating her for the nasty things she had done to this woman long ago and that "she" ' would get her yet' for being so bad. She tries to cancel the voice by singing in her head a nice song herself, but now thinks that because she can sing to herself at the same time as this voice is talking to her, the voice must be real because as she puts it, 'I can't sing one song while listening to another, so the voice must be coming from outside'.She is convinced it is real and just 'humours us' when she says she is fine again. Believe me, she is all there mentally apart from this.
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Thank you VERY much Kassie.
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Hallucinations are sensory experiences that seem real to people with Alzheimer's, yet they are not really happening. They see, hear, smell, taste or feel something that isn't there. And because hallucinations seem so real to them,I think it is not helpful to try to convince them that they are imagining things.No one wants to spend valuable time arguing with a loved one with Alzheimer's. Instead, acknowledge her feelings, try to reassure her that you are there to help, and redirect her to a pleasant activity. If she is easily reassured and the hallucinations aren't particularly upsetting, this is usually enough and the incident is forgotten.And sometimes hallucinations can be quite disruptive, in this case certain medications can be used, but they do have side effects and aren't always effective, so it's always best to try reassurance and distraction first.
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I have been using 7.5 mg of zyprexa to start and it has helped somewhat. The hallucinations still exist, but are not as severe as they were.
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I live in namibia-africa. my father also has auditory hallucination. he's been having it now for 2 years and it is getting worse. a psychiatrist prescribed some drugs for him but he is not getting any better. he hears people that wants or plotting to kill him or bad-mouthing against him and so on. please advise me further.
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Thank you sooooooo very much for your kind and informative response Dragon Flower. My mom is 83, but these "auditory" hallucinations have been going on for three years. BEFORE she really was on any medications. I requested tests to rule out stroke, tumor, urinary tract infection, etc., but everything has been ruled out. I do notice, however, that when she does not get enough sleep (due to hearing people "plotting" against her and "music"), the paranoia worsens and she sleeps with "me" to feel safe. This is truly taking a toll on "me", which I do not mind so she does feel "safe", but was simply looking for some guidance or "direction" so that I may best help her.
Thank you soooooo much. You have helped a great deal.
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You should also ask them to test for and rule out a urinary tract infection.
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Hi, there. I am a nurse and used to work in psychiatry. Hallucinations are always caused by a disturbance in brain chemistry. The causes can be multiple - high fever, sleep deprivation, dehydration, brain tumors, stroke, reaction to medications, dementia, and imbalance of brain neurotransmitters. In fact, hallucinations not caused by physical things are nearly always related to neurotransmitter disturbance.

Anyone can develop hallucinations at any time, at any age. You did not say what your mother's age was. However, in an elderly person, I would suspect that hallucinations would be most likely caused by:

1. Dementia.
2. Late-onset schizophrenia.
3. Unusual reaction/intolerance to prescription medications.

If it's caused by dementia, there's not much that can be done. If it's schizophrenia, it can be controlled with medication. If it's a med reaction, the solution is to stop or switch that medication.

Hope that helps.
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