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My husband has been diagnosed with Frontotemperal dementia. His identical twin has it also. They are 69. From what I have learned they are old to have it. Not sure how to handle all of this and know when is the right time for someone to come in and help? is it ok to leave him? Etc etc.
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I did reply to your question not sure where it went it wasn't the washing powder but he is in a new unit and they have taken hubby off some meds and it has all disappeared so its lovely now thank you
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Daisychains, did your husband get over the itchiness problem? How did they know he wasn't reacting to the meds or laundry soap? My husband has FTD and has gotten more allergic to our dogs as the years go on. Stubbstein, altho the diagnosis came at age 69, they probably were showing symptoms for years before that. It just went unidentified.
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My 62 year old husband is at least five years into FTD. Physically, he's OK, not the athlete he used to be, but the mental decline has been rapid. The kitchen area has to be gated to keep him from gorging on any food item he can find, including dog food. Hygene is a thing of the past unless I initiate it, and then he will put up a battle about it. I am very limited to the times I can leave the house w/o him, but I can't leave him alone anymore. I am 67 and can barely make a medical appointment for myself. Can't take him along anymore, because he drives the people nuts at the reception desk -- needs to see me, tell me something, wants the keys to the car, etc. You will learn the ropes as you go along. You'll know if he can't be left, if he shouldn't be driving, if you have to one by one watch him take his pills, if you have to tell him to take a pill and then tell him he'll bleed to death if he doesn't get in the warm water of a bath or shower after taking that pill. Each person is different, some combative, some docile, but that can change on a dime. I wish you strength, courage and patience. When the disease starts to take it's toll on you, if you can afford it, hire some in-home help to allow you to have some "me time". I am holding off on hiring help, because I've been told he could live for decades. Financially, I can't pay for help for decades, so I'm trying to hold off until physically and mentally I can't do it anymore.
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my husband has terrible marks on his arms where something is making it itchy they are saying its not the meds not the washing powder has anyone else come across this he has ftd and they are really nasty now and he picks till they bleed
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all I can say is my husband has ftd from 2006 he is now in a unit not sure how long for as he became aggressive and then vice versa very unpredictable but be aware of the meds they may give him not all meds are licensed for ftd please get pos as soon there are two that I know of one for finances and one for health can be expensive take care
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Talk to a nuerologist ASAP. Also Azheimer's Assn will help with resources for all dementias. AND Memory People on Facebook is the BEST
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My brother-in-law had FTD. Was diagnosed when he was around 58. He died in 2011 at the age of 66. He had been institutionalized for the prior 3 years and his family had been trying unsuccessfully to allow him to live on his own for about a year before that.

Before his family took him over, my nephew was living with and caring for him. He reallyc ouldn't be appropriate on his own. He had the typical aphasia that had developed so his communication skills for lacking which produce frustration and stress. When he was stressed, it led to argumentative and explosive behavior because he had no impulse control, and no inhibitions about his behavior.

In my BIL's case, it was not genetic. The doctors diagnosed it as being related to one particular highly aggravating incident in his life. The genetic form generally does come on earlier, so I would say that your husband and his twin are fortunate in a way did the onset was delayed. Of course, no one is fortunate to have any kind of dementia.

With my BIL, they did leave him by himself in the early stages but found it they could not prevent him from driving, which was dangerous. Taking away his keys and then his car only serve to make him violently angry because he believed he was fine. When his family moved across country and away from my nephew, they quickly learned that he could not be by himself. They ran themselves ragged sharing shifts so he wouldn't be alone but after a year of that, were forced to place him in a facility. Typical of all other dementias, he eventually died because he became ill and his body, his immune system, couldn't remember how to heal itself.

Since your husbands condition has come on late and there's no way to predict a progression, you will have to closely observed and evaluate his behavior to know if it's OK to leave him by himself, when it's time to get an in home caregiver or when it may become necessary to place him.

There is much you can read on the web about FTD that will help you watch for symptoms and signs.

Please keep posting.
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