Is there a permission form we can sign so her caregivers can help with our mom's insulin injections?

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My diabetic mother needs help with the finger prick test. She gives herself the insulin injections (4 per day) but may need to have it done for her in the future. We would like a template for a form to give her caregivers permission to administer the finger prick test and the insulin injections.

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Giving injections isn't that difficult, that's true, but, what is a little trickier, is the amount of work, calculations, monitoring, etc. that goes along with taking insulin. I'm type I and take multiple injections. (Fast acting and slow acting.) You have to also take multiple blood sticks to check blood sugar levels, count carbs to determine the amount to take to cover them with insulin, check urine for ketones if blood sugar is high, and other duties, including taking juice and eating appropriate snack if blood sugar drops suddenly. Even now that I wear a continuous glucose monitor, there's still loads to do, so, I can see how a senior with mobility and cognitive challenges may be overwhelmed with diabetic care. Often the actual injection is only part of the diabetes management.
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I know this was a while ago but in case others have the same question. Rules seem to differ by state to a large degree but we got around this to some degree by switching my mom to the pen, she was able to stab herself with it when instructed after her stroke but not able to dial up the number of units or remember the sequence. A non RN caregiver was able to put the new needle tip on and dial in the number of units and then help her put her thumb on the end and tell her to administer the pen. Mom has been giving herself injections for so long the process of sticking herself with a needle wasn't a problem. The technical issue is actually injecting someone with a medication so everything short of inserting the needle in a persons body and releasing the medication is fine. Does seem odd that any family member or friend, neighbor can give them an injection but not a trained care giver that isn't licensed for it...insurance and lawyers. ;)
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My mother is a diabetic also and I have to take her to daycare while I work where she is given her insulin by nurses (LPN). She is in a medical daycare. I get asked all the time why I do not hire aides for her to stay at home since the daycare is 40 minutes away. The reason is because home health aides are not allow to administer any type of meds or injections. I am employed as a home health aide and although I know how---I cannot perform this task on a patient---doing so would get you fired and yank your license! There is no way an agency will send a nurse out 3 times a day for insulin injections (given with each meal), so difficult for diabetics unless you can train and pay a neighbor or someone else. My mom was independent and did this all on her own until she had a 3rd stroke and now completely dependent on me. I wish you the best for a solution:)
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Going awry is a risk you take. All I am saying is that people learn to give themselves insulin everyday. They don't need an RN to give it to them. Family members are trained to give their children or elderly parents insulin; no special degree needed. The problem is lawsuits for ridiculous reasons. A credentialed caregiver can also go awry and make a mistake. It happens all of the time in hospitals and SNF. All I am saying is having to go to a nursing home just to get insulin is absurd and it should not cost your life savings to hire someone to give a person their injections.
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Reno55: You say "you can do whatever you want to in your home." True that, but what happens if something goes awry in this specific case?
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You can do whatever you want in your own home. You will not get home health to come in 4 times a day just to administer insulin. If you use an agency, it is possible that a home health aid working for the agency cannot give the shots. Why not teach a neighbor how to do it and pay them to come over 4 times a day. Testing blood sugar and giving insulin is not rocket science. Your only worry is hypoglycemia. If your mom is old with poor life expectancy, tight blood sugar control is not as important. Does your mom have type 1 or type 2 diabetes?
Depending on her age and life expectancy, I would not impose a bunch of dietary rules that have little scientific backing. She is not 40. Give her insulin to cover her food and let her enjoy the time she has.
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Just need to say, in some states LPNs can give injections. Delaware is one of them.
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The correct answer to "who can give an insulin injection?" is that is varies from state to state.
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Not so fast. As a nurse, all I can tell you is the caregiver must possess a license or some other medical education, otherwise you are opening yourself and the caregiver (and agency if there is one) to a lawsuit should anything untoward happen to your mother or the caregiver.
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Not an unlicensed caregiver unless it's your own immediate family (in Florida). You will need homehealth and a visiting LPN and it's NOT cheap.
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