My parents are starting to give expensive gifts, like a car, to their hired caregiver. Her employers want her fired for this and my parents angrily refused. What should we do?

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A caregiver got herself attached to my friends bank account (OR). She also transferred a CD to this caregiver six days prior her death. The bank allowed this transaction. My friend was on the most powerful of Meds. I am executor and trying to find any recourse.
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This is unethical and in the states I have worked in, illegal. She needs to be fired. The assumption might be that if they continue to give her gifts, they will get good care. There is little difference between taking these gifts and stealing.
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I agree with Lynn whole heartedly. There are so many wonderful paid caregivers out there but just as many that crawl out from under rocks. They align themselves with the elders and try to get them to distance themselves from their families. Worse case scenario: they end up having complete control of their lives.
One solution is to rotate caregivers either weekly or after a period of time. This accomplishes two things, they get to know more people and no one has too much time with your parents.
I have also removed anything of value and especially important financial info. from my Mom's home. Even the owner of the company suggested this...you can never be too careful. Also, drop in unannounced whenever a caregiver is there...just to let them know that you are around.
I keep reminding my Mom that these people are the "hired help" not family. Do not share personal information with them. Treat them as you would any worker and do not become too chummy.
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The caregiver is totally out of line to accept such gifts! ..and makes me wonder just what else she's been up to. If she works for someone else and they want to fire her - they should just DO it. Be careful here - if she's manipulating your parents and they WANT her around, the employer must be made the bad guy in the situation not YOU. You must act like you know nothing about it. My advice probably sounds manipulative but it's the sort of thing we must do to protect aging parents. As long as it's done to protect them or their interests, it's not an evil thing.

I'm assuming the caregiver is working through an agency - so talk with them, be SURE she does not find out that you were involved. Be sure you have your parents Power of Attorney, signed by them and filed with the county clerk's office BEFORE the firing and that the caregiver has not wormed her way into other things like their bank accounts. If you suspect abuse by her or manipulation by her talk with your local police; she may have done this before. Her employer should have done a thorough background check but often people slip through the cracks.

good luck!
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