How should I handle a new caregiver who has many good qualities but left my mother in soiled panties her first day?

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Should I call the agency? She paid careful attention to Mom sitting across from her in an attentive manner, she took Mom to an ice creme social in the facility, is polite and a very sweet person. I don't want her to get in trouble. This might be her first day with the agency. I think they should teach her what her responsibilities are. They might have a standard recommended way of cleaning a LO up after elimination. Mother has not had dirty panties like she had when I got home yesterday in the 2 and 3/4 years I have been with her constantly. Advice. Does anyone think I should talk to the young woman first? Mother could come down with a UTI if left like that. I had to shower Mom to get her clean and she did not want another shower, She had one just the day before and was tired. Mom and I usually get along. We settled with washing her off in bed and showering her today. We usually get along. This was difficult. Advice would be appreciated.

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Glad it seems to be working out better today.

I was going to write what Veronica did - have a list of duties you expect to be done. What I'm doing now is e-mailing a work scope to potential agencies before I even meet with them. If they don't have people who can do some of the chores, I need to know now. And in fact, some of the tasks would require training, which I can do.
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We are paying above the grade of a companion. We have Personal Care Services that includes incontinence care. Thank you all very much for your answers. The facility recommended the service. I want to keep good relations. I spoke to her before I left today and she seemed more than willing. Mother had clean panties and no complaints. She offered to clean the cat litter box. Think that would be nice and will let her know next week. Blessings
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I would expect a caregiver supplied by an agency to have at least the amount of training that a CNA has. That case cleaning the patient from the top of his head to the tips of his toes. con't setlle for someone who thinks her duties consist of a little vacuuming and flitting around with a feather duster.
When a new caregiver is hired make a list of their duties and the times you expect them to be acomplished. There can be a discussion on the first day and the tsks revisited about a week later.
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I guess I should have specified when I said "companion" that is just how I refer to my sons caregivers as socialization and activities out in the community are as big a part of it as the caregiving when it comes to bathrooming, safety etc. plus there is a "peer" element as well - my son is 24 and his paid companions are near his age and involve him in age appropriate activities.
However - they are well aware of their responsibilities as a caregiver.

BTW - anyone with any experience in dealing with bathroom accidents can clearly tell when an accident is old or fresh. Just by looking and feeling - with gloves of course- a dirty Depends I can pinpoint the timing of an accident.
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It depends on the level of care and attention that is expected by the caregiver and agency. If only a companion is that part of the deal? And more than that, how do you KNOW she left your mother like that? It could have happened so quickly it might not have been a situation before the person left, or could it have happened in those instants just prior to her leaving?
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I agree that some people are just not "cut out for this level of care."
In fact, this is the main reason that families finally put their loved one into a facility - incontinence, especially fecal. They can cope with almost anything else but feces.

This caregiver may have not understood what her responsibilities were, specifically bathroom accidents and clean-up. Also, if the woman is unable to communicate her own toileting needs, the caregiver may not realize that there was a problem that needed to be taken care of.
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I'd talk to her and come right out and ask if changing/cleaning up a bathrooming accident is something she's experienced in and comfortable with.

I've hired companions for my disabled son for a lot of years. My experience is that some people will say they'll do it cause they need the job, don't really know what it's about, think it won't occur very often etc. But when it comes down to it - they just can't cope with it. And that's just not fair to the person they're caring for. I've also had some that will do it cause they want to keep the job but they do such a terrible job - you wonder why they bothered at all.

I am very clear and upfront day one about the bathrooming and accident clean up - my expectations of what I consider "clean" to be. I suggest you do the same in a straight forward manner so she's clear in her understanding. If it happens again any time soon - let her go and get a new caregiver. Some people just aren't cut out for this level of care - and in my experience- they don't adjust. Ever.
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It has only been one day, there are bound to be growing pains. Now that you have had time to cool off I would speak to her directly about it; show her where all the supplies are, explain your toileting routine and your expectations. I would only go to the agency if this becomes a repeated problem.
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daughterlu, I remember back when I called a caregiver Agency to come to help take care of my Dad, the Rep from the Agency came over to the house to interview me and to find out what would be needed by the caregiver. Thus, the caregivers they send knew what chores would be required by them. Like getting Dad to change his Depends as he was noise blind that they needed changing :P

Finding the right match is very important. I know my Dad had over a dozen different caregivers during a week span, and he was able to narrow down two that he liked the best. Thus I could get both of the caregivers on a regular schedule.
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