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Would an Memory test like on the website memtrax be useful for a caregiver. I mean it is important to take this and detect changes in memory early, but would a caregiver actually use it?

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AD8 Informant interview has good practical questions re how a person is functioning, so I often recommend that to concerned family caregivers. Ideally the healthcare providers should be asking you these questions, but in reality many docs don't know about this interview.
http://www.alz.org/documents_custom/ad8.pdf

Agree with the others that journaling your personal observations is key! You can use the AD8 questions to give you ideas on what to track (if you aren't sure).
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Good idea!
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I administer a memory test about once a week to my patients. It's not a fancy test but it's effective in demonstrating where my patient is as far as memory and I can compare the results with the previous week's test. Are you ready? As I said, it's very, very basic:

I ask my patient what day it is.

I ask for the date and year

I ask my patient to remember this address:
John Brown
Magnolia Street
Chicago, Illinois

I ask my patient to tell me the months of the year backwards (which sounds difficult but if you do it it really isn't. I start them off by saying "December.....November....")

Finally I ask that my patient repeat the address back to me.

It's not a clinical test, it's pretty straightforward but it's a test that doesn't alarm someone if they can't remember the address or they get stuck on a month. And because it's so short it doesn't frustrate someone as I've seen happen with other comprehensive tests. It's just a tool to see where the patient is at on any given day.
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By all means take the SAGE test on the Web and present the results to a professional.
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I agree with Jeanne. My Dad has FTD, and I've read that many of the standard short memory tests (for example the Folsom mini-cog) are notoriously inaccurate for diagnosing frontal dementias ... that people can and have continued to achieve normal and even perfect scores on these even after reaching the point of requiring around-the-clock supervision. (The reason has to do with the exam's insufficiences in evaluating executive and frontal functions.)

Personal observation is key. But I recommend writing down your observations, or you may find later that you can't remember when you noticed some development, or what order things happened in ... I try to keep a "Dad diary," and the extent to which I'm able to stay on top of it is a pretty good barometer of how *I'M* managing my own stress ... ;-)
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I'd forget about it, (no pun intended) don't take any test you can't study for lol.
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I wouldn't. By the time there is reason to be concerned about memory it is time to see a professional. In my experience (with both my husband and with my mother) close personal observation is a more accurate indicator of impairment than a simple standardized test. My mom could pass the tests long beyond the point when she could safely live alone.

My husband had a completely "normal" neurological exam after he had started hiding bills under seat cushions because he didn't want to admit he didn't remember what to do with them.

A test can be useful. Personal observation is more accurate.
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I think Vegaslady is correct. I know the long I care for my mother the more I believe I am losing it! I keep telling myself I am okay, it is just all the stress I am under but I still have that thought in my mind.....what if?
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I just took the memtrax test and I personally don't think it's the right test if you are worried about someone potentially having a memory impairment. It may be more appropriate for ADHD. I know people with Alz that would pass this test with no problem. They just wouldn't remember taking it in a couple of hours. In-home testing is not a substitute for a doctor's visit. I have used the IQCODE which is an independent assessment (you answer questions about them) of the person's abilities. If you actually want them to perform a test and they are willing, use the mini-mental state test. This 30 point test takes less than 10 minutes. It asks questions like “what month is it” or “what city are we in”. The patient will also be asked to identify common objects and follow basic commands. Again be very careful with administering tests at home as the results can easily be misinterpreted.
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No. The memory verbal test given by a neurologist has both a time limit for responses, and in telling a story of about a paragraph you are then asked to repeat what you remember of the story. How will you do that online? If you are concerned about your memory, then go to a doctor who can correctly identify what your issues are. You could be deficient in Vit. D, B-12, have a tumor, etc. Only tests which can be done professionally will give you an accurate diagnosis. I am a nurse, and also a research subject for Mayo Clinic in the Alzheimer's project with other hospitals collaborating, and every two years I go in for all day testing. I've had a PET, and MRI, and blood work (as the research subject and free to me). Try to volunteer for one of these studies if you have a first generational (mother, father, sibling) who has/had Alzheimer's disease.
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I'm not totally sure what you are asking. Do you mean for the caregiver to take the test, or for the care giver to give it to the person they are caring for. I think it can be used in either case, but I have the impression, from reading info on, and reading through one of those on-line test, that it's really not intended for personal use alone. It's more of a tool to take to the doctor, and to keep for future reference. You take it yourself, or your loved one, does. Then you can show it to a professional, who can determine if it shows anything significant. Also, it can be taken now, and if it does not show anything, it can be saved, by the doctor or the patient, and looked at later for comparison to a more current version, to show any decline.
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I don't know about an online test, but I don't see why not. The Cleveland Clinic Lou Ruvo Brain Center recently offered free screening tests to the public. Their slots were quickly filled. When you are caregiving for someone with dementia you start to question yourself. Are my little slips normal or am I losing it? It can be a relief to test okay.
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My question would be why are you concerned that a caregiver take a memory test? If someone you love is responsible for the care of another and you are concerned about their memory, you may need to get them to a doctor rather than an online memory screening.
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