How can nursing homes take care of dementia patients when they have to use the bathroom but cannot verbalize?

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More specifically, my mother knows when she has to move her bowels but cannot tell an aide, or the aides are too busy to help. Mom is wheelchair bound and cannot use the bathroom without help. Of course, i asked how they take of this but have not received
a clear answer. Are there any best practices to recommend how nursg homes should handle this?

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From reading other forums on this website, such bathroom issues exist even if the loved one was living at home and being cared for by a family member. I read quite a few posts about pee/poo on floors, rugs, bedding, car seats, etc. There is no perfect solution for such an issue.
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In my mother's case: she was in a N.H. but the aides preferred that she go in her pants because it was much easier on them to clean her up on THEIR schedule rather than to struggle with her to get her out of bed, into the wheelchair and into the bathroom. Then they pretty much had to wait on her to go & if they didn't wait they'd come when it was convenient for them, not immediately. Shameful, shameful, shameful!
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Yes, a lot of great answers and i appreciate them all. Thank u!
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I used a flat piece of foam on top of a moisture barrier to keep the skin dry and reduce the pressure to avoid bed sores.
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I think you know why...aides are too busy to jump.I have mom in a board and care, 6 residents and 2 caretakers. It is a tough job no doubt. Do check for bedsores. Calmoseptin, don't know if I spelled it right, but it is supposed to be one of the best moisture barriers. Check with pharmacist. It is over the counter but they keep it behind the counter....Anyway, you have a lot of good suggestions in this forum.
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Thank u again for these ideas!
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Great ideas from all the posters above. When I had the unfortunate opportunity to work in a nursing home while I was in nursing school there would be a potty schedule list where the patients would be offered the toilet on a 2 hour basis. Great in theory but nursing homes are notoriously understaffed and it does not always get done. Pull ups are great and provide a bit of dignity. They have pull ups that look almost like underwear, in different colors ect. It is such a precarious road we are on trying to maintain our elders dignity while keeping them somewhat clean.
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By law they are to check them every so many hours specially if they know they are consider to be called Incontinent . And they should be cleaned and changed. If you had your parent at home it would be the same thing if they couldn't tell you. You would have to check what what I had to do for my mother when she was at home with me. She at rehab now and she has to be checked. she off and on with the incontinent thing.
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Having a bowel maintainance schedule is very common in nursing homes as is toileting residents on a regular schedule just as you would with a todler. making sure the staff follow the rules is another matter especially with rude agressive patients The airhorn is an excellent idea and I remember the capt gave his mother a whislte. You could also use a bell or soda can with pebbles inside or install one of the wireless door bells at the bedside. sucess depends on the patient under standing what they have to do and why.
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I like the idea of an air horn. Perhaps also very simple button code could be used. When she needs to go, press the button 2x, or maybe 3x, instead of just once. Ask the admins to note the charts and put up signs where the buttons are located so anyone who sees it knows what it means.
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