What is the best way to care for someone in advanced stages of dementia who has severe pain and hates to take meds?

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There are a lot of interpretations of "Advanced Dementia" - stage 7 is what my hospice uses, which means not being able to speak, walk, transfer, incontinent, etc., and basically being bedridden without help. Others may call being seriously confused and sundowning advanced, or it may seem that way compared to normal. I know when we scooped up mthr, she was late 5th stage, and it seemed awfully advanced at the time. Now that she can't walk or talk, those days seem like she was almost fine!

To get her to take meds, you don't *ask* if she'd like to take her pills. You present them in a little sauce cup, the kind that take out dressing or croutons come in. You *tell* her, "Mrs. Last name (like she's not your mom), it's time for your medication. The doctor wants these taken exactly 12 hours apart to maximize effectiveness, so let's drink up." Often our elders will obey strangers much better than their children, so you act like you are not related. You can even put on/take off your glasses to look different.
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My mother has advanced to where she refuses meds (except her insulin) and can even taste them when crushed. She is in severe pain most days in her hips, legs and lower back. Ive bought numerous litions and creams and have finally settled on a crean and a roll on called Real Time pain relief. RTPR.com. I wish you best in your search.
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Even so, crushing pills to add to liquid may be a short fix. This will no doubt progress to requiring additional help.
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Advanced dementia patients qualify for Hospice care. The Hospice nurses are experts in handling pain needs. Call Hospice.
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Oral meds can be added to yogurt, applesauce, or cottage cheese. Some capsules can be opened, some not -- check with the pharmacist.
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In the hospital I was shown how to use a pill crusher and medications were administered with ice cream.

DH still looks forward to taking his pills with Ice Cream! But not all pills can be crushed. The pharmacy can advise you on that.

I gave my dad morphine in a tiny pill in a spoon of water and he had no trouble taking it.
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There are a variety of medications and methods of taking or administering them. For a lot of medications patches are the least effective as the skin is supposed to be a barrier and is meant to protect and not permit anything to enter our bodies. Mucous membranes are the best this includes oral, as well as vaginally and rectally.
Talk to the doctor and explain that oral medications are a problem. Or if the person is on Hospice talk to the Hospice nurse and explain the situation.
One of the best pain medications is Morphine. Easy to administer and a pretty inexpensive medication. It will NOT kill a person, it is not used to hasten a persons death. It will, among other things, relieve pain, relax muscles, allow a person to breathe easier.
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Pill takers cups with a built in shelf for the pill; pain patches; cad pumps; injectables and intravenous.
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I have the same problem with giving meds I use a pill crusher and put it in some juice
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There are pain patches that can be used.
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