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Maybe this person Was like my mother who went to the cardiologist for a cold...she went to him for any complaint and he prescribed anti depressants, meds for incontinence...you name it..she saw him every 3 months...when I took her in my house I got her geriatric dr who asked me why she was even seeing a cardiologist ...she had an angioplasty. 25 years ago and no other heart issues since....go figure...
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Look up the medication in the PDR or at drugs.com. If the seizures are caused by TIA's or cardiac arrhythmias, it would make perfect sense for a cardiologist to treat the underlying cause. •Cerebrovascular disease is the most common cause of seizures in patients over 60 years old who are newly diagnosed with epilepsy
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Is there actually a problem?

As far as I'm aware, any suitably licensed practitioner can prescribe most medications. I'm not clear if you want to ask a cardiologist to renew the patient's prescription and are not sure that would be allowed; or if the cardiologist has altered the patient's regimen and you're concerned that s/he might have done so unadvisedly.

Specialists don't usually like to cross borders, though, not without consulting anyway. What's happened, exactly?
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Was this person actually diagnosed with epilepsy by a neurologist, and if so, why isn't the neurologist involved in prescription decisions?
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Yes, it is legal, but I don't know why the primary care physician was not the one doing the prescription. We would have to know more to answer if it was okay.
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