Can you sign a Statutory Durable POA with a Durable POA?

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A statutory POA is simply a POA in which that particular state has designed it with very specific requirements, and you can find it as a form on many attorney general websites, etc. Many states have both general POA laws and statutory POA laws.

I used statutory POAs for Florida and California for my family members because it's certainly easier to grab a POA off the internet than to draft a general POA from scratch. My own POA is a general (non-statutory) POA executed under the general POA laws of California by an attorney.

That being said, I'm not sure I quite understand the question - are you asking if an agent under a durable POA can sign as the principal for a new statutory POA? If so, no - only the principal can sign their own POA.

If you are asking if a principal who already has a durable/general POA can execute a new statutory POA - yes, if the principal has capacity to do so. Hopefully there is revocation langauge in the new POA, because in my legal job, it's more difficult to deal with two POAs (and yes, you can have 2 POAs if there's no revocation in the newer POA, and that's not a lot of fun when there are two different agents fighting over control of an asset.)

Could you explain your situation a bit more?
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I know of only a POA for property and one for health. You might be better addressing this question to an elder attorney.
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Sorry never heard of a Statutory durable POA.
I was with my Mom when her POA was written up. Yes she signed assigning me as POA but I didn't.
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