Is it o.k. to print out online forms for like POA or Medical POA online, and then go sign in front of notary?

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Yesterday morning My mother and I stumbled upon the conversation of having some kind of papers or will in place in the event we need them. It's not a easy conversation to speak about, but I was glad that we more or less stumbled upon it, instead of me bringing it up. I don't want her to feel bad or anything, but I just explain how important it is we have documents in place so in the event we need them I can make the decisions I know she wants made. Its scary to know if something happened right now, medically speaking or legally speaking also I can't make the decisions my mother has spoke about. I know the best route is to go to an elder care attorney but we can not afford to do that at all. So can I just go online, and print out forms that we fill in, and sign in front of notary? Is that still legally binding? I need something that allows me to make financial decisions in the case she isn't able to do so any further since I have a investment on a home with her that does not have my name on the deed, but I've paid penny for penny what she has. I need that to be protected for myself & son. If anyone can offer any advice I'd appreciate it. I want it done the right way, but attorney fees just are not an option. So I figure something in writing would be better then nothing, right?? Thanks guys so much, Love & light to you and yours! Happy weekend as well:-)

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Just be warn, if anyone prints up blank Power of Attorneys or Wills on-line to fill out for themselves, just one missing word or one misplaced word could create landmines for that document. And if the State requires two or three witnesses, and you only have one witness, said document would not be valid.

If money is an issue, do try to find an pro bona attorney or Legal Aid to help you out. Glad you are looking into having this paperwork done. It can be difficult to get our elders to even talk about Power of Attorneys or even Wills. Thank goodness I got my parents to update their Wills last year, or it would have might a nightmare after my Mom recently passed because of the way the old Will was written.
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I just lost my Mom and my sister was insisting I sign a POA with an attorney. we went to this Atty and had it drawn up.Well Mom passed away B4 it was signed.. I was told by Palliative Care Nurse as long as I had consent from my 6 sibs I could make her decisions for her. Which I did for the last 10 yrs of her life. In 2006 my sibs had a closed meeting at to which I was not invited passed the vote to me as care taker. So don't sign anything I didn't want to sign a POA or DNR. With my Mom passing B4 that was all set was her last gift to me.
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Dianne, I got forms for POA off of LegalZoom. I had a social worker look at them and she thought they were fine. I had reservations but I printed them off and dad and I went to a notary. Not once did I ever have a problem using those papers. I closed my dad's bank account with them and dissolved an annuity with them and no one gave me any problems.
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O.k. I will check into volunteers that may do this work pro bona. Must be the best way overall to go in that regard, and will have her sign the paperwork in front notary. Don't think they notorize it otherwise. Wouldn't be legal, but I appreciate any and all tips, and believe me I look into all you guys post or advise me to do:-) Thanks, and God bless!!!!
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Pamstegma is right - you could lose your home and every cent you put into it. I know my mothers lawyer volunteers one day a week at a senior center in the neighborhood where his office is located. Check around and see if you might find a similar situation. Maybe check with your county department of aging/disabilities - they might be able to point you in the direction of a pro bono lawyer. A "do it yourself" DPOA legally notorized is better than nothing but to really address protecting your investment in the house and therefore you and your child, you need to look at who's names are on the deed, a will for you and your mother and a medical Advanced Directive for at least your mom would be wise.
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Make SURE you are using a "Durable POA" form that is valid for your state. Your mom signs this in front of the Notary, not before. She has to show ID, she has to show she understands what she is signing.
You really should see a lawyer because your investment is meaningless in the event she needs Medicaid for a nursing home.
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