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One son lives in Colorado and the other one in North Carolina and a third son lives in Georgia. Can more than one of us become power of attorney?

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In my family and my husbands family we thought it was a better plan to have all the children as POA. We were lucky in that we all trusted one another and our parents trusted us as well. We wanted to be able for any one of us to do whatever needed to be done. Husbands family had the names listed in order of age and I think only once did we need a letter saying that one or the other declined to not take action and it fell to the next in line. In my family any one of us could take action. The wording was slightly different between the two documents. As POA for my aunt who has no children, I requested that another cousin also be listed with me in case I could not take necessary action. That cousin passed away and thankfully my aunt was still competent to sign a new POA listing another nephew. I know I've read on here that it is recommended that there only be one but it has worked out for us to have multiples. It's also frequently mentioned on here that caretakers many times die before their elders. As old as our parents were, the children were also old and almost all have health issues. It just seemed more responsible to us to be prepared for that eventuality.
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You're quite welcome. Good luck to you.
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Thank you for your answer.
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You can assign two POA s but it can turn into a hassle with communication and disagreements. Pick one son to be POA and designate the others as contingent POA s.
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