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Some people have different attorneys in fact (the person who has powers of attorney) designated. One for healthcare and another for "estate" matters.
Having both is called "Durable Powers of Attorney".

Sometimes this is the caregiver, sometimes it's not. It depends on family dynamics, who all is involved, and trustworthiness.

The person designating POA has to be in their right mind, and attest to what's in the document in front of a notary. If the person is in their right mind, they can designate whomever they want. There is nothing you can personally do about that outside of going to court over it.
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I am my moms care manager - I guess that could be a title - I take care of everything for her but don't do the actual hands on care as she is in a care facility. We have been lucky that mom has enough money to have been able to hire in home help even prior to the facility. I have tremendous admiration for the people here who live with and care for their elderly loved ones. I can't imagine - just doing what I do has sent me to the brink of a total melt down. But getting back to the topic - I am also moms DPOA. Occasionally my brother suggests that he handle the money and I continue with doing all the grunt work. You know - the shopping, dr visits, supervising her daily care, making her appointments, visiting every other day, being available 24/7 for whatever, take the brunt of her anger etc. while he managed her money via his laptop at his vacation home, or on his many month long leisure trips etc. I was damned if I was going to spend my time picking up her Depends at Costco and then have to ask him for her money to do so. He would put me through the third degree explaining every dime I spent - and feel superior doing it if he had his way. I told him it was an all or nothing package.
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My uncle is in the hospital and wants to give POA to his caregiver who I don't trust. He doesn't have any children. Is there anything I can do?
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I thought after I wrote this last night that it is often a conflict of interest if the caregiver is NOT the POA. The caregiver has the best idea of what the needs are, but if he/she can't get the POAs to agree, then there can be a lot of frustration and incomplete care. This can come about if the financial POA decides keeping the money is more important than caring for someone, or if the healthcare POA doesn't agree with the caregiver about what the person needs. We see that sometimes here on the group.
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JessieBelle is right. It's often very helpful when the caregiver is also the POA.
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No, this is totally okay. Many caregivers are also POAs for finances and healthcare.
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