Follow
Share
Like everything else the brain controls this. If the part of the brain gets damaged that controls the sensation you get to hold it till you get to the bathroom, then the person is not aware they are going. They may no longer have the ability to hold it. Just like a small child. By taking them every 2 hours you may be lucky to catch it. Its like you are going backwards and become like a small child.
Helpful Answer (1)
Reply to JoAnn29
Report

My dad (with Parkinson's) did not become incontinent ever. He was catheterized at the very end, as he was incapable of getting up at all, but could have used a urinal. He didn't eat anything the last month of his life, just liquids, so bowel incontinence never happened.

It's as individual as each person's disease.

BUT--I would say that dad was unusual in this.
Helpful Answer (1)
Reply to Midkid58
Report

I think that by the end stages, if some other comorbidity doesn't take them sooner, everyone will gradually lose control of all bodily functions. After spending years on this forum I know that "early severe stage" could have very different meanings depending on who you are talking to, a lot of people characterize the person they are caring for as having severe or advanced dementia long before many of us who have BTDT ever would. And dementia is also an umbrella term that applies to many differing diagnosis, one size doesn't fit all.
Helpful Answer (1)
Reply to cwillie
Report

All? Each persons journey is different. If I had to guess I would say all eventually become incontinent. Incontinence is often that line in the sand when crossed care is moved to a facility.
Helpful Answer (1)
Reply to gladimhere
Report

Ask a Question
Subscribe to
Our Newsletter