Can someone take your DNR away after you signed one?

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My Grandma had a procedure and ended up signing a DNR. Now she is in a Rehab place and they said its no longer valid and they also labeled her with Dementia. What can we do

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The DNR may have been signed in the hospital, on its specific form, and limited specifically to the procedure she had there. That would explain why it's not considered valid by the rehab facility. They probably have their own form of DNR.
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Why do you need to do anything? Did your grandmother express a personal wish not to have various interventions before the procedure? What are you afraid will happen in the absence of a DNR?

FF is perfectly correct that it may well still be possible for all of this sort of documentation to be put in order; and that would be a good and useful thing to do. But meanwhile, sit easy; and if you have concerns that your grandmother might be subjected to treatment she would not have wanted, discuss those with her doctor. Doctors don't need to see a DNR to make wise clinical decisions and will act in their patients' best interests - which should take into account any preferences she has consistently expressed before. Does anyone have power of attorney or similar authority to act on her behalf?
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Jennifer, I wonder if the DNR that your Grandmother had signed was only in relation to the procedure that she had... thus it expired after she was placed into Rehab.

One can have dementia and still have pockets of clear memory.... or maybe it is brain fog that one gets after being under for surgery, I had that for a month.

Contact an Elder Law attorney to see how your Grandmother can sign a DNR that stays with her at all times.... plus have her elect and sign a Power of Attorney, a Will, etc.
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