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My mum is 103 and has Breast cancer, and is in Residential Care Home. Have been told that mum will have to move out because the Care Home is in Financial difficulties, and in future will only be taking in Nursing Care Patients, and Dementia, and respite care patients. This Care home already has Nursing care and Dementia Patients, but also residential patients. Can the do this it seems an outrage to me.

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What do patients do when staff is being laid off OR they can't find any more people to work there? Very small town inconsiderate institution only interested in none. Not enough staff for patients, have cut from 3 night PCA's to ONE, one for each wing & there are several, they are expected to be efficient at "all" times & if next shift employee don't show up they have to stay 2 & 3 shifts. This is cause for abuse to the employee. If they leave their fired. Isn't this illegal much less dangerous to both patient and tired employee?
I "strongly" urge you to read "Difference between Skilled nursing home" then go on to "The Code of Federal Regulations, 42CFR 409.33 (a) (b) & C. This was published in2014 but nursing homes haven't caught up yet!
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My husband is now in the hospital because he was refusing to take his meds in the nursing home ...he still is doing the same..he has early onset dementia w diabetes znd maybe early onset altzheimers. .the hospital doesn't know where to put him..I wd 'll him in a six bedroom home. But don't know if there is one close by to us s bo do I ask..he is on Medicaid and mass health Nd Medicare Nd bc federal. We both were fed employees
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Colagecon, ONE MORE THING. Check with the area LUTHERAN CARE HOMES. They are of course profit driven also, I am sure, but not in a way that the Private homes are. The Lutheran home where my brother in law ended up, had to have profit to stay open, but they had loving people who had a ethical care attitude. You do not need to be Lutheran to stay in the one in our little town. God Bless
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Colagecon, HOSPICE... YES, that is the answer IF you want to keep your mother in the place. When we had a fire, we went to live at a Beautiful Place (active Retirement and medical care. After being there for 6 to 7 months, we realized, we never ever wanted to go to a place like this. They are pretty at the lobby and the rooms are really OK, but the human side was horrible.

While we were there, I heard stories of people who were told to leave. I agree, the document you signed for her to move there, will hold many answers. BUT, I would find another place. It may be hard to do however. Most of these large Retirement Homes are turning toward the middle of the road medical care. They are turning all their floors into Medical, as it is the best choice financially for them. Remember, they are in it for the PROFIT. This place did not have lifts - even in their Memory Care unit. If your medical needs became greater than what they offered, you were moved out. My brother in law had to move (even tho his injury was caused by unskilled care). When he was done with his hip surgery, they would not take him back. He went to a place (not so pretty) that ended up being a wonderful loving place that was well equipped with the needs of the elderly. The State did step in and did an audit of the home where he fell. While I was there, I saw at least 3 injuries caused by the elevator not being level at the floor when opened. The homes are now showing a MENU of care. If you need all of them your bill is more than most people could afford. Only the people on State Aid can actually afford to stay there. It would wipe us out in a year. But, they know this and they are waiting for your STATE aid to kick in. These places survive on the Taxes of every person in the State. It sounds to me that you have been given an option and HOSPICE would be your first choice. Her care would be followed and WATCHED. God Bless
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Also, in most leases, you will find the answers to your questions on what they can do if the care for your loved ones becomes too much for their plan. Most can mandate extra help aids at your expense, charge extra for feeding and delivery of food to the room, or end the lease with notice if you don't comply. Hospice can usually override the facility and take control as "added help" to your situation.
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Yes, a Hospice team can be very helpful regarding resources, advocacy, and quality of life issues.
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If you are in the US, you should be reaching out to your local Hospice team. They can help greatly at this point.
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If the home is in financial difficulty and can't change its patient model it's likely they will close anyway. This is very sad, especially given your mom's age. I hope you will consider a 6 bed home, lots more personalized care and less corporate intervention that revolves primarily around profits.
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I am very sorry to hear your news. If you, and your mom have been satisfied with the level of care to date, I recommend that you see if this facility has an Ombudsman (support and technical assistance/advocate), or your state's Office of Elder Affairs for additional resources. Also, many localities have a Citizen Advocacy Group(CAG). This sounds like an administration financial decision. If your mom is receiving quality care, I believe it is in her best interest, to remain where she is. A move is a major life event at any age. For someone 103 years old, with a medical diagnosis, it can be a traumatic event. Best wishes.
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I like the advice Garden Artist gave. Definitely find out what legal stand your facility has to move Mum. You may want to consider a lawyer. It is very difficult for someone so elderly to transition to another place.
Please bear in mind though, the policies the facility has don't determine how the staff treats Mum. The staff and other patients probably love her dearly and treat her very well. You can tell by how happy she is. They, in fact, may be just as upset as you that more difficult patients are going to be admitted and want her to stay.
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Think of this - would you really want your mother to live and be cared for by people who (for whatever reason) don't want her there?

Whether or not they have a legal leg to stand on - I'd start looking for another place for her to live.

sorry for your dilemma.
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That's an interesting, and sad, question.

First, I would read the entire application and any accessory documents to see if they have authority.

Second, it sounds as though the attitude isn't one that's conducive to support for someone of your mother's age and who's battling cancer. Whether or not it can be done, it might be better to find a more financially stable place for your mother.

I take it you're in England, Canada or Australia, by the use of "Mum"? I don't know what the laws are there, so I won't even attempt to address what could be done legally, other than to inquire whether there are oversight and ombudsperson agencies that might become involved.

It is an outrage, and a very unfortunate situation. Your mother deserves better treatment; I hope you can find a facility that will treat her with the respect and care she deserves.
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