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Medicare does not typically provide any in-home care, except for visiting physical or occupational therapists or a visiting nurse. Are you sure your father does not have Medicaid?
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He is on Medicare. I will check the guidelines. Thanks to all who responded.
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As your husband has POA specifically for his father's healthcare, he not only can appeal the decision but should do. It is very much part of his responsibilities to act as his father's healthcare advocate, unless - as Jeanne raises - his father actively doesn't want him to. And I agree with Jeanne that it is also very important for him, or someone else who knows his father's daily routine very well, to be there in support during assessments and appointments.
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Was your father alone when they did the last needs assessment? Elders can exaggerate their abilities, and the awarded hours are based on the answers the assessor receives. For example, my mother said, "Oh yes, I can get my own meals." But a daughter was there to say, yes Mother, you can microwave food, but it is very hard for you to carry it to your table using your walker. And if it spills it is impossible for you to get down and clean it up. (Mom got Meals on Wheels.)

I doubt that a POA is even needed to discuss Father's needs with the Medicaid case worker. No one had POA for our mother. We simply designated one of us to be the contact person. It might become an issue if Father adamantly didn't want to appeal the decision -- but in that case a POA wouldn't help much. (Guardianship would be needed.)

So I'd say go for it. Ask to review the assessment document. If there are some answers that are wrong, ask for a new assessment, with a responsible adult present.
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Is he incapacitated? How is the POA written? It is either standing, good any time or springing, only valid with determination, usually by two doc's, that he is incapacitated.
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IB - Do you mean medicaid (those who meet low income rules) rather than Medicare (healthcare for seniors)? If so, each state's rules vary and you can check the OHIO website for their guidelines.
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My husband has the healthcare POA for his father, who currently lives at home and has aides come in. Medicare is reviewing the situation and has said they will be cutting down the number of days the aides can come. He lives in Dayton, OH. We believe his father needs the 5 days he currently has and want to contest the decision.
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Can you give us a bit more information? Who has the POA? Where do your parents live? Who is the primary care giver?
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