Mom is acting out with violent behavior toward the aides at her nursing home. Can she be kicked out?

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I'm not sure if this is a side effect of an increase in dosage on her Exelon Patch, or if her dementia is getting worse. The facility has asked if I mind her seeing their on site psychologist/psychiatrist, not sure which he is. Of course I said I didn't mind. I have a feeling it is just mom, though. She had issues when I cared for her at home, and this is the 3rd incident since she has been in the nursing home. Just wondering if they can make her leave if the behavior continues.

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Going to take couch out and just put chairs in so he wont think it is his bed
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Cant other peopke live in the house
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My dad lives with me and he is extremely violent and does not have a uti. He is on seroquel and still every night when it is time to go to bed because he is falling asleep on the couch . Try taking him to bed and he hits kicks and calls you all kinds of names. He is in stage 7. Lost as no facility will take him
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The short answer is, check your Rental or Admissions Contract. It should say in there what their Behavior Policy is, and what Procedure they will follow as far as notifying you there is a problem. I'm sure they have something like 30 days, or 3 episodes, before discharging someone. As far as providing "assistance" in finding another facility, if current one is private pay only, no, they will not provide help finding a new home, they have a waiting list of better-behaved customers who want to move in. Good luck with all of this. I have several friends whose parents have been asked to leave AL because of behavior, and in onne case, just because they were a lot older than the rest of residents, they wanted more active residents.
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The "psychiatrist" my father's first nursing home insisted he see was in fact not board certified in anything, let alone geriatric or general psychiatry. When I contacted a qualified local psychiatrist, I was told he would not go into the nursing home, as "it has it's own psychiatrist." When I offered to have him come to the office, the reply was, "The doctor does not see residents of nursing homes".
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My mom had to come of a medication that made her more irritable when she started being even more unreasonable than usual for her and hitting at people with her purse. She was not very strong and could not have injured anyone though. We got through some things OK but eventually did get our 30 day notice and I found a different place. Typically, they can act without the notice if and only if the person's behavior is really not manageable from a patient and staff immediate safety and harm perspective. And I also found out from experience that you want a thorough medical eval and not just transfer to geropsych to get a big pile of psych drugs. It can be the usual UTI, it can be some other infection or unidentified source of pain, it can be an MI or stroke that makes things acutely worse. Don't get me wrong - the right meds for the right thing can work wonders, as long as side effects don't bite you on the butt, but always bear in mind that the cognitively impaired person may just start lashing out rather than verbalizing AT ALL about what hurts or does not feel good. A couple meds my mom was on that did not agree with her at all were great choices to try and have been a Godsend to some people, but caused problems for her, and conversely, a couple they hesitated to use for fear of more common side effects were just the ticket. YMMV...and yeah, start lining up options for other facilities. Be honest with them and tell them what the needs and behaviors are, and you may be surprised that a different facility of the same type will be just fine, or you may have to escalate to a higher level of care.
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Absolutely the nursing facility can kick her out...That just happened to a friend she had to take a leave from work and find a place for her mother.Good Luck my prayers are with all the Caregivers out there.
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If she is incontinent there is a high probability of a UTI so having her assessed for one should be done immediately. Fecal matter reaching the urethra will cause infection. Since the body does not respond to the infection as they would in a healthy younger person such as burning during urination the infection, groin discomfort the infection can travel to the bladder and eventually to the kidneys and shut them down. The visual indication would be delusional behavior which would be a prompt for assessment of such.

The next probability is that she may be in the combative stage of her disease which will eventually pass. I suggest that you find a facility with a unit that deals with theses specific stages. Visit often so that everyone is kept on their toes. Bring familiar items she had at home to orientate her to the surroundings.

Residents at a skilled nursing facility have their days structured dressing bathing meals, activities and early evening entertainment including physical therapy is provided .The complete acclimation period is about 2 weeks until they adjust and become familiar with the environment and schedule. A structured environment tends to soothe and calm dementia patients.( READ WHAT IT'S LIKE TO HAVE ALTZHEIMERS) on this site.
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I agree with ferris. If you look closely at the literature on these dementia drugs, you'll see that they are minimally effective at best and come with a host of quality-of-life altering side effects (diarrhea, headaches, drug interactions, etc). They may be worth trying for a younger person with early onset dementia, but for the elderly, there's more downside in taking them than upside in most cases.

The community can certainly ask her to leave. They have to protect their staff, other residents, and even visitors. They are telling you that they aren't equipped to handle aggressive behaviors and you should take that very seriously.

However, it sounds like they're willing to try to turn the situation around and you should work closely with them on that if you like the community and would prefer that she stay there. But, it may be time to look for a specialized dementia unit. Look specifically for one that claims it uses a "resident-led" style of care, where residents aren't forced to adhere to a rigid schedule. That can eliminate at least some of the situations that may incite your mom's aggression – no one forcing her to bathe, go to bed at a certain time, eat on a set schedule, etc. Also, dementia staff are trained and experienced (at least some are) in all the techniques of persuasion that mitigate negative behaviors.
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I am currently dealing with the exact same thing. When I read your post I thought I had written it. The place my mom is in told me three strikes and she will be asked to leave. They have sent her once already to the Hopspital ER when she was remanded to their Mental Unit for evaluation for 20 days. She came back with the exact same medication and they did nothing. She went last Thursday to the ER again, but this time they did find a UTI and sent her right back to the home and they said that since she did have an infection they would not count that one. My mother sundowns terrible and gets agressive and aggitated. I have been trying to work the physician also and are trying several medication options that none to this point have helped. I too may have to find a facility that is more in tune to my mothers actions.
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