Can Medicaid take your house, land and other assets such as cars, trucks and tractors if valued under a certain amount?

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Certain items like cars can be kept by the original owner, including property if the petetioner feels that health will be restored. The property may have a lien on it to be sold at death for recovery. HOWEVER the question is who will pay for maintenence and taxes? If a spouse is involved there will be some separation of assets. I suggest you go to the library and read the book How to protect your family's assets from devastating nursing home costs by Gabriel Heiser. It includes state by state regulatiins.
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Yes, Medicaid in a sense does take things. Read what you sign on an application. MERP, Medicaid Estate Recovery Program allows the state to recover costs for such things as long term care after the patient has died. That is why you need a knowledgeable elder law attorney or estate planner ahead of time if you have significant assets that you hope to shield from reimbursement to the state for the tax money it spent on your care.
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Jasper, just a reminder, your father's assets and income will be looked at, not yours.
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Medicaid is administered by each state uniquely. The overall to keep in mind for Medicaid is that it is an “at need” entitlement, in which you have to show to be “at need” both financially (usually impoverished) and medically for the specific Medicaid program. Someone who owns multiple cars, homes and land will be found to have too, too many assets to qualify & will need to legitimately spend down assets till impoverished; or wait 5+ years after transferring assets before ever applying.

Local tax assessor records on real property ownership dovetail to states database. Ownership history with value is just a few keystrokes always from being found.
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Medicaid does not take anything. But if your assets are above a certain amount you don’t qualify for Medicaid and pay privately. If a married couple it’s really best to consult an elder attorney familiar with your state and all exemptions to preserve assets. Each state has different rules for Medicaid so an expert can be worth investment.
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