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She is Medicaid pending...seems everything going good,but they asked about my acct, with her name on it(it was for emergency situations)

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Give them all of the vital information. As mentioned, it may depend on how the names were listed. If necessary, see a elder law attorney. Good luck! Please keep us posted.
Carol
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In Washington State (where I live), a joint account is indeed counted as the applicant's resource. Our financial officers recommend that if an adult child needs to be on mom or dad's account to help them manage the money, they should be added as an "authorized signer" to the account, rather than a co-owner of a joint account. With a single account owner with an authorized signer, the authorized signer is allowed to write checks, deposit funds, withdraw funds & etc., but all withdrawals and payments from the account must be on the behalf of the account owner (mom or dad). With a joint account, my state's Medicaid says because the money is equally available to BOTH owners, they don't care whose money is whose, and it all gets counted together--so it's best to have separate accounts with the protection of an authorized signer in place.
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How was the account funded and when? If you can show this is your account funded by you then give Medicaid that information. If your Mom placed any funds into that account in yhe past five years, then that portion of the account is considered her asset. Were the finds in this account used for Mom's benefit? Then show Medicaid that documentation. Get with an elder law attorney to assist.
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It is really commendable that Medicaid IS looking at every account that has an applicant's name on, because there are so many who try to defraud the government programs. But I'm pretty sure if you provide the documentation, it was an account your mom never used (i.e. she didn't have her Social Security check deposited there) and all transactions were totally yours, then this is just a little bump on the road to being approved from . Medicaid. Best Wishes.
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That's a good question Conniy. My Mother had my brother on her accounts with her for many years before he was killed in the OKC bombing in 1995. She then added my name, her only living child. She always told me it was just as much mine as hers but I never wrote a check, deposited into the accounts or withdrew anything because I didn't share in that thinking. The only checks I write now is for her caregivers, bills, groceries, medication and things she needs. I should ask the bank if I am a signer or joint owner. Something I don't know how she set it up as. Again, good question
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She can only have a total o 2000 in savings & checkings for benefits. Medicaid program looks at all accounts she are one
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Was this a joint account? If so, they will probably count it as an asset. You should as an eldercare attorney, who may give you a free half hour consult.
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He is not a minor. I'm on the account as his POA. I transfer money into a Special Needs Trust that only I can handle. This SNT is notx figured in when calculating his benefits.
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Teacup, it's going to be difficult for people to understand what you meant. You should have said "Medicaid only allows you to have a total of $2, 000.00 in assets."
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In WA State [maybe also CA and others], if a welfare applicant's name is on your accounts, DSHS considers that also owned and accessible to the welfare applicant--even if they aren't a signer, and even if they never handled money in that account, and even if none of the deposits were theirs.
IF your accounts state: "Pay on Death [POD] to [welfare recipient's name]", then those are not counted; welfare cannot count those as assets of the applicant.
IF you are a POA, you can be a Signer on the elder's accounts [keep it as only their money--no co-mingling of funds for anything!], and not be named on them, which means IF You are the welfare recipient, the elder's assets are not considered yours, as you are "legally assigned to handle, but not own the assets".
I have been informed by DSHS, while assisting multiple clients, that DSHS makes NO differentiation between those listed on any account or asset; if the welfare applicant or recipient's name is on that asset, it also belongs to the welfare applicant or recipient and, that asset may either put the applicant over-limit to get help, or, cause them to lose significant aid from State".
With State Assistance dwindling in availability, and too many potential recipients going without, it makes sense to just take their names off the accounts---I must wonder: why is your Mom on your accounts, since she is the elder you are caring for---why aren't you POA on her accounts? Have you been co-mingling your funds and hers, trying to simplify paperwork?
DSHS looks at ALL assets, and looks-back 5 years for what else the applicant may have got rid of or sold, that DSHS might think could have helped tide-out the recipient, stalling off their applying for aid.
Once they put the data on assets through their computer, it lets you know what the recipient now gets.
First, they allow $2000 in accounts, but that might also be a moving target. When we hospiced Mom's last spouse here, DSHS said as a couple, they could have $40,000 of assets; but when he died, that allowed asset amount dropped to $2000! If applicant out-right owns the home they live in, that MIGHT Not be counted, BUT...depending...DSHS can put a lien on it, so when the elder moves out for over 6 months or so, the State takes the liened property and sells it to get paid back what was spent on the recipient.
About all States have aid-recuperation rules. HOW they do it, varies.
Some States aggressively pursue immediate family for repayment....HOWEVER...if that would impoverish the immediate family, or deprive them of means to earn a living, and it can be shown in court, DSHS backs off from next-generation debt collection: they don't want to force more people onto State Aid.
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