As the POA, can I sell my Dad's home and not lose Medicaid benefits?

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And still be exempt from Medicaid recovery upon his death?
My mother passed away and I am the designated successor with DURABLE OWER OF ATTORNEY, DESINGATION OF HEALTH CARE, SURROGATE AND DESIGNATION OF PRENEED GUARDIAN.
My father is in a nursing home with Alzhemer's and is incompetent.
For over 4 years I was the only caregiver living with them until it became necessary, due to my mothers strokes, to enroll both of them in the same ACLF in 01/04/10. After another stroke, I enroll both of them into a nursing home on 06/27/10. On 12/19/14 mother passed away.
I still receive mail and have a 43' trailer on the property.
The value of the property is approximately $150,000. Upon Dad's death the property is to be split equally between my sister, brother and myself.

If I sold the property ASP there would be a contract to close with my sister and brother 50% each, buying me out, with my brother becoming the successor POA.

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You are correct.

My parents will (separately) has serving spouse first, myself second, my brother third and my sister forth as DPOA.
I have spent over 6 Years taking care of both parents with little help from my brother or sister. My mother passed away December 19, 2014. My sister, her sibling and my brother have just added more disbelief in not respecting my sacrifices or my mother's wishes. I spent over $50,00 taking care of my parents. My brother and sister say "I am the oldest son making it my responsibility until I die, then it is my brother then sister's turn". It is sad. They can have it. I just want out and keep my sanity.
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With your dad on Medicaid, I think they will put a lien on the house to gain some of their money back form paying for him being in the nursing home.

Do a search from the search site box on the upper right hand corner of this page about MERP for more information.

Why would your bother become the successor POA if you sold the property. I've never heard of that. I thought someone was the POA until they gave it up to the successor POA.
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