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Can I remove my mother from a nursing home in Massachusetts and move her down with me in Florida even though my nephews have POA for her because they live in Massachusetts? She is 75 years old and has Alzheimer's and the nursing home she is in is terrible. Can I remove her without asking them?

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If your nephews have health care power of attorney, you will not have the authority to move her unless they agree to it. How is your relationship with these nephews? Why do you want to remove her without asking them?
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If she is on Medicaid for the nursing home it will stop at the state line and she will have to re-qualify in the new state.
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Consider how this will affect your life, if you move her then it all falls on you till the end. That could be years. You couldn't go back. Unless you really have strong proof of bad care, let it be.
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What is the reason that you think that mom's care is not good? Have you discussed it with the the other family members, who actually go there and see what the care is like? I might try to confirm what you may have heard. Did your mom tell you this? And, I'd get legal advice if you are interested in moving your mother. Moving a person who has dementia can be a challenge. There are many things to consider, even if you are able to get approval from the POA.
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Does anyone have medical POA (healthcare proxy -- often set in the Living Will or Healthcare Directive)? That is who has authority to decide where Mom lives, if she is not competent to make that decision herself.

Would your nephews object to your mother moving?
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Goodness I do find posts like this one frustrating! Donnajean, are you still interested?
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Where are you getting that her care is terrible? Is it possible your mother is saying so? If so, that may be her missing her home and wanting to go back, which she apparently because of Alzheimer's, she can't. Just a thought. Best wishes to you all.
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I just have to say, be very weary of reviews. My dad was in a facility that has age in place care, 5 levels, i believe. They were not giving him his meds, one of which he could have died from not receiving, not making sure he was well cleaned after bathroom usage, red rash to prove, feeding him sugar filled foods whenever he asked (he's diabetic), doctor said he can go home, see he can get from the wheelchair to bed and back again, no problem take him home, Aargh, are you kidding me. So I transferred him, at the point I was leaving, this bimbo hands me a questionnaire, not 1 line for your actual experience, only on a scale from 1 to 10 how would you rate.....with questions about quantity of food, quality of food, etc. Not one about his care or how well he was treated, so the reviews are nonsense and manipulated by questionnaires that do not give you any real data. Buyer beware.
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Why not just ask your nephews if you can move your mother? They might be very agreeable.
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Try having a heart to heart conversation with your nephews to try and resolve the issue. I know it is hard to see your mom battle this disease and her living condition are not good. To uproot her altogether will go the POA.
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