Can I remove all of elderly parent's unnecessary prescriptions?

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I have an elderly parent that recently overdosed on his prescribed narcotics...is definitely showing signs of dementia but has not had formal evaluation. Discharge orders were to remove all previous medications from the home. Well, he pick and choose d what could be disposed of. Does the family have the right for his safety to dispose old medications that he is no longer taking?

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That's a tough situation. Maybe someone with more medical knowledge than me can chime it.

Did you talk to the attorneys about contesting your dad's competence in an procedding to get Guardianship? I might try to find a good, seasoned attorney, perhaps one who handles Elder Law and see if they can brainstorm some remedies for you. (There is more than one way to skin a cat. See if they can get creative.) If the previous attorney was primarily a personal injury lawyer, they may not have been thinking outside the box. There may be no easy answers. Regardless which way you go, it seems challenging. I wish you the best.
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Thank you Sunnygirl1. Yes, very bizarre. The physician gives him the prescription then he gets it filled at pharmacy then we never see it again...he takes it when he wants it...we have yet to learn the new prescription details. (we have searched and searched when he is sleeping or showering and cant find it).

I have talked to an attorney, because there was no apparent physical damage from the overdose, they will not take the case, but have a year to file if we wish to pursue with our time and money. The only advice, file a complaint with state board. I have POA...it reads my mom AND I, and we are matter of fact...its durable. The physician office has asked that I not return to his appointments...momma referred them back to the copy of the POA...Im just trying to take care of my parents...I do not believe I have crossed any lines of authority (except making my dad angry when he doesnt get what he wants). Im just very new to all this and needing to understand physicians and their processes, working with MEDICAL ASSISTANTS, not nurses and trying to manage 2 aging parents with confusion and aging complications. And yes, I have made the physicians office very edgy to say the least.
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When you say that the doctor puts the narcotics in your dad's hands, do you mean he hands him the prescription on paper or gives him samples. (I didn't know that was possible.) After your dad overdosed, why the doctor would do that boggles the mind. I think I would see an attorney and get advice. Something sounds very bizarre about this. I would normally say write a letter explaining and asking for support from the doctor, but it sounds like something is off with this doctor. Maybe, others will have suggestions for you. It sounds like a very stressful situation.
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Thank you all for your comments.

We honestly believe it was accidental...loneliness, dementia, depression, simply not being in his right mind and having a large quantity of mixed doses in the house from where he doesnt take them as prescribed. Since the overdose, I have control of all the current prescribed meds (except the narcotic) because he and his physician "have that worked out". He only has that, tylenol and zyrtec. He was discharged in the care of his primary physician.

Because of the large quantity of narcotics that he willing disposed of the day we got home from the hospital, I fear the extra bottles in the cabinet that may or may not be empty, that his habit of hording the pills will continue. Unfortunately, his primary physician gives the instructions to "not let him manage his meds" but puts the prescription for the narcotics in his hand. As the children, we believe he definitely needs home health (at the very least an evaluation of the fact that he doesnt manage his meds properly and the unsafe environment in which he lives), but the primary doctor is not working with us. I am in the beginning stages of searching and trying to grasp what is right and wrong, legal or not legal. I have walked with them daily since the discharge, but its a mess on so many levels and its taking its toll. I am desperately wanting to work with the physician, but not understanding why he says one thing but does another.

Mom is the primary care...but when dad gets frustrated or irate, she is put in an uncomfortable and unsafe situation; ultimately she caves to his demands.

I guess my fear is that if I do "clean out the cabinet", when he discovers the cabinet empty it would not only put mom in a bad position, but I believe he will not allow me to continue to help them. (at least for a few days..he may forget until the next time he looks in the cabinet).

PS. We have a local physician that we can turn over the meds and they give the patient a receipt for everything and then pulverizes the meds. This is a wonderful service and we are very grateful it exist!
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wildfire, there comes a time when an elder needs more supervision when it comes to taking their medicine. If there are prescriptions no longer in use, yes get rid of them. Remember, do NOT flush the pills down the toilet.

My Dad was the opposite when it came to pills, he would forget to take them. We even tried using one of those daily pill trays, it worked for a couple of years but realized recently that Dad was getting forgetful about even what day it was... so he wouldn't take the pills... or he would take half of what was in the tray.... or he may even have taken two days worth. Oops.

My Dad now has supervision regarding his pills. The senior living facility where he lives, we signed him up where all his pills are safely locked in the nurse's office, even aspirin, and the Med Aide will come twice or three times during the day to give Dad his pills.
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Was the discharge contingent upon having him continuously supervised in his home? Do they think the overdose was accidental? I can't imagine anyone being left unattended if that was the case. Obviously, if he is not competent to properly take his meds, he could be at risk. Plus, he could overtake other meds too, even those that are not narcotics, that could be dangerous. I'd be concerned with things like Aspirin, vitamins, laxatives, anything in the cabinet could concerning.
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Was the overdose unintentional because he is unable to keep track of his meds? If this is the case then yes, I would get rid of whatever he doesn't need but before you throw out the meds you gather up check with his Dr. first. You don't want to throw away something that your parent needs.

Your parent may need closer monitoring from now on if he's unable to figure out what meds he's supposed to be taking.
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