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My mom has a weak heart, little use of her hands and has to use a walker. I am going to have to stop working to care for her. We live in Tennessee.

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acare, I found one of those articles that caregiveryes above had mentioned.

https://www.agingcare.com/articles/quit-job-to-care-for-parents-150227.htm and scroll down past the ads to see the whole article. And there were many comments by readers regarding this subject matter.

Another thing to thing about is if you get health insurance through your work. If you lose that by quitting, then you would need to go out into the open market and find something. There might be a cost difference.

You have a lot to think about.
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Although not directly related to your question, there is a very popular thread following the article "Should I quit my job to take of my parent", or close to that title, which you may find helpful. I agree with both the above posters that medicaid is the only way for help and also that 24/7 is beyond what most of us really can handle, both emotionally and physically. Good luck to you.
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Medicaid is the only program I know of (other than long term care insurance) that pays for in-home care. In many states the care can be provided by relatives. It is seldom the equivalent of full-time pay.
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I'm not aware of a way to get paid for taking care of loved ones, unless they pay you from their personal funds. If she's not able to do that, I'd check to see if she qualifies for a nursing home or some professional care to come into the home to help her on some days.

I'd look into what kind of work is required in taking care of someone around the clock. It's a huge responsibility and a lot of work. Before making that decision, I'd do a lot of reading about how other people have done similar things and how it worked out. You can find people's stories here and on other places online.

I'd also consult with an attorney about the finances. I'd check to see what resources your mother has to provide for her care and if she might qualify for Medicaid to pay for LTC.

I'd also seriously consider the consequences of stopping work to help care for your mom. Leaving the workforce can put a dent in your retirement and it might not be as easy to get back into your career years down the road. It's a lot to consider.
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