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lets say the elder person gets sick really bad and the guardian asks that the hospital put a dnr in place but none of the family member want the dnr order.

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If you are concerned that the DNR will be applied too early, get in touch with the hospital and with the doctor for your relative. Let them know that you will create a fuss if your loved one is not treated appropriately. Let them know if the guardian has a financial interest in the person dying sooner than necessary.

If you can get permission to talk to the doctor, ask what kinds of situations might come up. DNR doesn't mean pulling the plug, in most cases. It means allowing natural death to occur. For someone who is elderly, or extremely ill, or in late, "out of it" stages of dementia, with no hope for a return to an enjoyable life, allowing death to occur may be a kindness. For a young person, it's easier to believe in torturing them by keeping them alive, because they haven't had a "full life" yet.

My mother, not yet ill, told me she wanted to be DNR. I told her, "Mom, the first time, we have to try, in case you can get better and live a good life. But after that, OK." She passed quickly, as she would have preferred. We did try the first time, but quickly gave up when it didn't work, as she wanted.

This is a confusing and upsetting problem. Tell us more about your specific concerns, and the situation your loved one is in.
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I think a question unanswered here is what if everyone in the family has a different opinion than the guardian on whether or not the patient would want a dnr? Must all give in to the guardian? Obviously legally only the guardian can make or break the dnr so the question is if they feel storngly enough can they revoke or change the named guardian? yes? that would be MY question, and I do have a similar question not asked yet.
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When I got a DNR for my sister, the MD had to sign off in agreement, and I am the guardian. If the patient has only minimal chances of getting out of bed and recovering and may require multiple and frequent resuscitations, why prolong the suffering? I know my sister would not want to live in an incapacitated state even though Medicaid would cover it all. It's not an easy decision, believe me.
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My understanding is that a "Health Proxy" is different from a "Guardianship/Conservator" and are therefore not to be interchanged. Check with you state laws.
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What are the wishes of the elder? Has she/he expressed their wishes at the end of life? Is there a living will? What is the overall condition of their health and what has the doctor recommended?

CPR is not always appropiate and in elders the survival rate, most notably the survival rate without significent impairment is very low.
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I think you would have to go to court. Is this an actual Guardianship, or a medical POA? Do you think the guardian is likely to make such choices? What would the elder person want?

Would you be opposed to a DNR under any circumstances? If a person gets to be really sick, and they aren't ever going to get better, and they are not able to enjoy life, why keep them alive with machines?
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