My aunt is in a nursing home for rehab in Connecticut. I am her Power of Attorney and she wants to give me $3000 for helping her. Should I worry about this?

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She is not on medicaid and I'm not sure if she will have to go on medicaid.

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naheaton you are exactly right the money is the root of of all evil i know cause what i went thru i wouldnt wish it on no one but i came out ok with it..so yes make sure its ok with any relatives cause they can stabb you in the back and you wouldnt know what hit you
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tremaliz, before I took one dime from your aunt, I'd make sure the rest of the family is okay with it. As soon as money is brought up in many families, look out! There's a reason the Bible says the 'the root of all evil is the LOVE of money'.
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I am glad you have a contract, luvmom. You are a smart lady. No one can come crawling out of the woodwork later and claim you did something illegal. Good for you.
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I have a caregivers contract so I am allowed $15 for 8 hours a day. I pay approx 30% of taxes on it and keep records for everything. My Mom cant be alone. Been to the lawyers, all is legal. I would do this to be safe because people climb out of the woodwork when money is involved. Good luck.
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I hope, PaulAnthony51, that you are the only one who will be inheriting anything from your aunt after she dies. If there are other inheritors I hope you are keeping meticulous records of how you are using some of your aunt's funds. What you are doing sounds like it could possibly land you into a lot of legal trouble. Will you be able to show satisfactorily that the money was used to look after your aunt instead of you? I would think you should have a contract drawn up that would outline what your pay is for looking after your aunt. You would have to declare such pay as income I presume.
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no you should have no guuilt about this at all. It took me a long time to get over the guilt myself. Being unemplyed and having to take care of her I had no choice but to use some of her funds such as SS and an annuity to care for her in her own home. I love with her so I am basically a full time care giver.
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WHATEVER YOU DO GET EVERYTHING IN WRITNG AND WITNESSED
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Hi Roswitha,

Even if it's a gift for helping her, all of the information that was listed above is still applicable when it comes to legalities, taxes and future Medicaid qualification. You must be very careful when accepting gifts, especially when you are the Power of Attorney.

Best wishes,

Shelley
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no its a gift for helping her.
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Just one other thing to consider regarding the "gifting" process and Medicaid qualification: Medicaid has become very picky about "gifting" and will now "look back" 5 years and more when making a decision about Medicaid qualification. If it had not been customary for your aunt to give this type of gift, then the amount given will count against her qualification.
As a power of attorney, it's good to document expenses (mileage, time spent at appointments, doing errands, paying bills, etc.), even if you are not receiving monies for your role. You never know if such information will be needed at a later date.
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