Can diabetic prescription pills be given in liquid form?

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I've been reading this forum about how many pills the seniors are taking, my parents included. They would love to stop. 84 years old and taking 10 a day.

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Compounding pharmacies are also good if there is a very large pill that someone needs to take [some call it a "horse pill" because of its size], this pharmacy might be able to make the pill in a smaller size.

Also good if someone feels sick from taking a certain needed pill, the pill can be compounded using different "filler" ingredients... sometimes it is the filler which makes the pill bigger thus easier to handle that causes the side effect problem.... or the binder that keeps the pill together.... or the coating which makes the pill easier to swallow.
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Thank you for your thoughts. The pill is the easiest when thinking about the spoon.
especially since they are a bit shakey. I might look into the pharmacy about the compounding.
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esposta, even if a pill is made in a liquid form, it is still a "prescription". Making it liquid doesn't change anything.

I agree, there are times when one is taking too many pills. My parents had a long list of pills, half were vitamin pills which I didn't think they needed.

Ok, now to see about the prescription be made into liquid form. There are special "compounding" drug stores that will do this. And they can add flavorings to the liquids to make the liquid taste better, for example grape or cherry.

Please note it is a hassle trying to get the right amount of liquid into the syringe or spoon syringe, the print on the syringe is very small. Then washing out the syringe/spoon after each use. I rather just take the meds in pill form, much easier.
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I'm not sure. I take insulin, as a Type I. I will say that even if it did, I'd be wary of a senior measuring their own med. I think I would even be wary of doing it for myself.

If they don't want to continue all the pills, why not discuss it with their doctor. I've read that some seniors, decide that they don't want to take certain kinds of preventative meds, like Statins. I think meds for diabetes is different though, since if not taken, you can get sick real quick.
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