Can dementia rage lead to severe indigestion?

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Individual misplaces items (papers, clothing, bedding) and rages at caregiver for stealing (and selling) them. Often severe, debilitating stomach ache and sore throat follow the incident, apparently triggered by eating something, lasting as long as a week. Have others observed anything similar? In other words, can dementia paranoia lead to physical symptoms?

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It certainly sounds possible. Controlling these episodes in any way you can is important (I'm sure you're already doing your best). You may want to take note of when this happens and what triggered the problem, how long symptoms lasted and any other pertinent details. Then you can approach the doctor with some facts and ask for help.
Take care,
Carol
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Sure anxiety can bring on all types of symptoms.. I try to keep on schedule and especially avoid confrontation.. When I don't, my Mom will have a panic attack. Even if the incident happened the day before she will go to bed and will think about it all night and wake me up in the middle of night!!!

That's why it's so important to educate yourself about the disease so you can learn how to survive daily with as little stress as possible..Good luck💮
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I think it is possible that the anxiety/agitation can cause indigestion and other symptoms. I also think it is possible that it is the other way around. That is, the beginning of a physical symptom such as indigestion can trigger the agitation! Either way, I like Carol's suggestion of keeping track of these incidents -- both the agitation and the indigestion and the sore throat, etc. and discuss at the next doctor's visit.

Losing things and blaming others for stealing them is very common in some kinds of dementia. Often the person is hiding the items to prevent them from being stolen! Typically they use the same hiding places repeatedly and that makes it a little easier for the caregiver to find them. If possible, try not to argue about whether they were stolen, but sympathize with the loss. "Oh, I'm so sorry your white sparkly bracelet is missing. I know how much you like that and how well it goes with your purple flowered dress. The last time I saw it it was on the end table. Let me help you look for it. If we don't find it in two days, let's see if we can find another one to buy."
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Has any one checked her for heart situation. Heart problems can manifest like severe indigestion, nausea, and agitation.
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