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By this I mean walking getting in and out of the car and or easy chair.

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Sometimes the "patterning" effect of repetitive PT can help. Not to be callous or anything, but it can be similar to training animals to respond to certain calls, or actions. If the dementia is too advanced though, that might not help.
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The doctor can order physical and occupational therapy, which may help retain some mobility.

But it's totally up to the patient to cooperate and do the exercises with the therapist. Sometimes they just won't, so they don't get the benefit and lose ground.
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Thanks for your response
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It varies crimlily and it varies a lot and it is all individual I have a uk site that may address your concerns hun http://www.alzheimers.org.uk/site/scripts/documents_info.php?documentID=101
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Yes, it can. Plus a lot of times you are dealing with arthritis, too. Plus the less they move around, the less they want to and the less they want to, the less they do. It's a circle.
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Yes it does cause ones ability to move around as they once did. I had a very hard time with my mother getting her into my vehicle...she'd lost the ability to understand "lift your leg up mom". Such an awful disease.
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I think it could...especially in its advanced stages. As parts of one's brain shut down, I think motor skills could be lost. Perhaps others who will know for sure.

If this is your loved one, though, a doctor should make the final call. It's also possible that one might be injured and unable to vocalize that.
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