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Dear loridenise,

So many good points already mentioned. I feel it really depends on the person and their willingness to take on that duty and responsibility. If you have any doubts at all maybe have the person talk to an elder law attorney so they understand fully what they are getting into.
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Can you take the stress that may come with the POAs. You will be making the decisions when ur LO can't. Paying bills, applying for Medicaid. I hate forms and that is all I did so Mom could continue with her utility discounts and tax refunds. Do you think you could handle the spend down for Medicaid. Calling around to liquidate money. Sell a house and belongings. And clean out! And if the estate is large can you handle that. Mom is gone and I am still dealing with stuff. Will never take on another POA except for my husband.
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Your question, I believe, is that the person to be the POA might have PTSD and is on disability?
The stigma associated with any psychiatric diagnosis , or mental illness often rears it's ugly head.
People with a diagnosis are not "incompetent" although they may have challenges.
Some are very good at finances and decision making on their loved one's behalf.

If in doubt, ask your own doctor. But if you are handling your own personal affairs well, and know when to seek advice from support systems, go ahead.
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I'd consult with an attorney in that person's jurisdiction, but, normally, that's something the person appoints when they are competent. If they are competent, the attorney may assist. You might also inquire about Guardianship, if that is appropriate and even explore applying for Representative Payee with Social Security. SSA has info on it on their website as well.
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