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Not knowing the circumstances in which the question was asked....we are left to our own assumptions. My guess....an election year. Might be for voter registration or absentee ballots and they need your party affiliation (if voting in a primary)? Might be as others have suggested to help to determine who might be a good fit with their roommates. We all know that politics (especially) and religion can be hot button issues that could potentially cause serious conflicts.

I don't think it was asked to be discriminatory......because we all know better than that.
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Reply to Abby2018
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My mom was asked if she was political. I thought it was because there was a resident at the time who was quite verbal about his political opinions and there had been some upsetting arguments at the dinner table. They wanted to know if she could be placed at his table without him annoying her.
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Reply to ArtistDaughter
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Did they say why they were asking? I see you're a wife caring for her spouse, so I don't know why it's any of their business.

The local Board of Elections handles that and, even when a voter app is being completed - unless you ask for help filling it out - I don't see any reason for them to be asking.

Your voter application can be sealed and mailed or returned in person without anyone having to see what you wrote, at least in my county.
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Reply to MyThreeSons
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worriedinCali Jan 27, 2020
contrary to what people think, the elations staff can absolutely see what you wrote. How do you think the ballots are removed from the envelope ;)
They aren’t supposed to look though. I worked for my county elections office for the entire year of 2016, you might be surprised how much is done by hand. They will even re-create, by hand, your ballot if you don’t fill it out correctly, that what your votes can be counted.
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Worried, good point. But...even when I vote there is nothing I sign that shows I am a Democrat or Republican. The people working the Polls do not need to know my Party. Its really no ones business which way u may vote. I registered as Independent as did my DH.

I can see them asking who wants to vote, because they can receive absentee ballots a few weeks before election day.
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NeedHelpWithMom Jan 27, 2020
I am independent as well. You know, with all the squabbling back and forth between parties, I think about George Washington warning people not to divide themselves. He was opposed to separate parties because he felt they would fight each other than stand together. Oh, how he has foresight on the matter!
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It’s an election year in the United States. There are elections coming up in March in some (maybe all?) states. Residents in long term care facilities are entitled to vote and it would not be unusual for there to be outreach in these facilities making sure the residents who want to vote are registered to vote. Voter registration forms ask if you want to register with a specific political party. We really need the context of the question.
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Reply to worriedinCali
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?!?

DID a care facility ask what political party you or your loved one belonged to?

It certainly seems a strange question. Could you put it in context, please? Was "none" an acceptable answer?

They wouldn't be trying innovative ways of ensuring a good fit among room-mates, would they?
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Reply to Countrymouse
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My dad was asked who the President of the U.S. was by a doctor that was asking questions to determine where he was at cognitively.

I think we need the context of the question.
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Reply to Isthisrealyreal
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FloridaDD Jan 27, 2020
Not the same.  Fine to ask general questions.  Not fine to be intrusive.
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I can see where this question may be asked as part of a dementia assessment. Or maybe they have other residents that have a strong political slant and try to keep residents separate as much as possible?

It being asked and the answer as part of qualifying for admit, no.
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Reply to gladimhere
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Janny, did someone at the facility ask this question? And in what context?
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Reply to BarbBrooklyn
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I do many nursing assessments using guidelines from an organization . This organization promotes standards for how to perform comprehensive client assessments. The questions cover almost everything- culture, ethnicity, etc, for factors that may influence how we provide optimal care to our diverse population.
That organization is industry standard for nursing assessments in case management.
I have never seen that question on any assessment. Political affiliation is not a factor in care delivery so, no, I don’t think that question can be on an needs assessment. Doesn’t make a hill of brand difference and you wouldn’t approach or card for them differently.
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Reply to Shane1124
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BarbBrooklyn Jan 27, 2020
Thanks for that, Shane! It was the only possible context I could see for asking that question, glad to stand corrected.
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As part of an intake survey registering a patient's likes, needs and preferences, I can see that this question might be asked.

Like asking what religion you are or what language you prefer to speak.
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Reply to BarbBrooklyn
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I don’t see that where it’s their business
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Reply to NeedHelpWithMom
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I know they ask if the resident is registered to vote when their admitted, because they are still entitled to vote if competent.
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Reply to mollymoose
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what law or regulation says nursing homes can’t ask?

I think we shouldn’t answer this With a yes or no answer unless the specific law can cited or without knowing why the OP is asking and what the context of the conversation was. Perhaps it was a misunderstanding. People in a facility have a right to vote. Political affiliation isn’t a protected class. Perhaps there was a voter registration drive at the facility and a resident was asked their political affiliation because that is one of the options on a voter registration form-you can register under a specific party or no party at all.
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Reply to worriedinCali
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JoAnn29 Jan 26, 2020
Lets say, they can ask, you don't have to answer. 😊
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No they can't ask this question. And, I have never heard of it.
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Reply to JoAnn29
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From personal experience, some staff will ask and say all kinds of things. I always report it to the administration, but I don't finger one particular person. I don't want to destroy someone's career just because they are ignorant. I want them educated. So I report the incident to admins in great detail, I just don't name names, and suggest they should have diversity training for the employees.
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Reply to needtowashhair
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That's like saying a hospital can ask what political party you belong to. I'd say "they" have no business asking this. Was it an individual staff member who asked? If so it probably doesn't represent something the facility does. If an individual staff member asked it, you don't have to answer. It can also be reported to the admins of the facility.
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Reply to Geaton777
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They can ask what they want, but you don't have to answer.
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