Can a 95 year old survive an aortic valve replacement?

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Hi all. My relatively healthy mother has been advised by the ER cardiologist to have a heart valve replacement. There was an article last year in the NY Times that this operation is expensive and causes other problems especially in the very old. Any experience with this?

Her symptoms are difficulty breathing, weakness in her arms and fingers, raspy throat.

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Hi Judda, I just read this long thread. I feel for you. I know the stress you've been under. I went through the same thing with my 96 year old grandmother last year. The big money machine was pushing my grandmother to have a possible TAVR on her aortic valve. It started with her regular cardiologist. This happened not only once, but TWICE. Each time about a year apart, they scheduled visits with a cardiac surgeon for an evaluation to review her options. And each time they told her they would not do it, but maybe someone else might. This was the same surgeon too! All this while her memory was confused and she was given a little hope at same time. At one point she had made up her mind not to do any surgery a year prior, and then a year later she's being forced to consult a surgeon again because she's being egged on by a new cardiologist in her medical group because her mental capacity is not 100%. And they send her to the same surgeon she saw previously who denied the surgery previously! It angers me to no end that the medical profession pushes a 96 year old women who also previously denied surgery herself would exploit her health and mental capacity for financial gain. She was not accompanied by any other family member. This is the way she has chosen to carry out her healthcare and existence. She is a strong independent woman, does not like to rely on others for help yet she is not 100% and clearly is not aware of some of the abuses that are occurring. It's frustrating to us caretakers who are expected to be available to our loved ones yet have one arm tied behind the back. I know Judda your concerns and do hope you have remembered to take care of yourself throughout this time. That is the best you can do. I wish you good health my dear.
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It takes a lot of courage to do the right thing.
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Juda you hit the nail on the head. Just follow the money.
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I'll let you all know what how it goes with Dr. Taylor and Mom and I.
There is a wealth of info on the internet on fixing heart problems at any age without the darn drugs (that only made her weak and didn't solve the problem at all), and if heart surgeons are telling us online how diet and other approaches actually work better, the only reason we are submitting our loved ones or ourselves to their methods is brainwashing by the huge corporation$.
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Yes, Judda mentioned in another thread that she was having trouble logging on with her account, so now she is "reincarnated" as happygal LOL.
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Call me stupid, but does Juddha=HappyGal?
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Mom is already relieved and less fearful. I hope it draws us a little closer too.
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Hi. I'm back! So Mom had the cardio catherization and after all that the hospital told her she can't even have the valve replacement: she has to have open heart surgery or accept that they can't do more for her. "A death sentence," Mom murmers.
So I called my Functional Medicine dr, ND, who is an author, speaker and has practiced curing others of all kinds of things and he agreed to see my mother, see what he can do for her and even to work with her family doctor, (if he is open and willing, we don't know: maybe) With diet, supplements, and his biomeridian machine, he'll steer us better than a doomsday operation will.
If nothing else, he can make it so she ages with her mind intact and no other additional diseases, acquired from the traumatic operation.
I plan on being Mom's "buddy partner" taking care of my own health needs and both of us keeping an eye on each other's progress. I can work on my own heart issues and lose that weight at last. He was very helpful to me two years ago. I need to keep on so I hope our new plan will be fun and fruitful.
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Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement is a new technique. At her age, I would still expect an 8 week recovery time IF there are no "complications". At her age there are too many complications possible make a list.
The person you really want to talk to is the Anesthesiologist, because there is a practical limit to what a 95 year old can survive.
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My mother had the TAVR version of aortic valve replacement 1.5 years ago (at age 88), and she did fine. My friend's father had it at age 98 (and he also did fine).
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