Brother stealing from mom. Any ideas?

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My youngest brother is the baby and has always been protected by mom. He's been in prison most if his life but was released about a year ago. Since then, he has been stealing her money, opening credi cards in her name, stealing her pain meds, and coerced her into signing over the deed to her house. She is 94 and will protect him no matter what. My concern is that when he has run through her money who is going to take care of her. Even if we (my brothers and sisters) turn him in, she will lie to protect him and will be devastated at what we've done to her baby. He is her sole caregiver by choice as he tries to keep us away. And she is mentally competent for her age. Any ideas?

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Don't fool around for 1 more minute. There are special laws written to protect the elderly and they enforce them. Not sure of your state but start with a phone call to the Office of the Attorney General. Have a short blurb ready to go -youngest son swandering 94 year old mothers funds, isolating her from the family. No MPOA or DPOA. Do NOT say she has it together. You're not qualified to determine this and based on her actions I highly doubt ner competency. Tell the AG you need his help. Be willing to follow through. If you know this is happening you've got to stop it, don't you think?
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my older brother and a hired caregiver took care of her before youngest brother got out of prison. Prison brother threatened older brother's life so he doesn't go around any more. Prison brother fired caregiver to save money.
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I took my mom to the bank. Closed her account. Took her to my bank and opened a new one where I am the signer and it was still her account. Paid her bills for the last 5-6 years of her life. She had plenty of money without my brother taking advantage of her not knowing 8 dollars from 800 dollars!
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If I were you, I'd walk away and never look back. Your mom is obviously happy with him and he is taking care of her. Just let it go and move on with your life. Trust me that some things are not worth fighting for and this is one of them.
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This activity needs to be put to a stop now! Seek out an attorney.
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Does your mother have any idea of what your brother has done? Does she know he opened credit cards in her name? Does she know that the house was not a trust at all and she totally signed over the house to him? Does she know he is taking money from her bank account? Have you or anyone else spoken to her about what he has done?

There is a reason he was in prison. Sounds like it didn't do anything to change his ways. Somebody must talk to your mother in private to notify her of the things he has done. If she decides to protect him even though he is putting her into financial ruin and she is made aware of everything he has done, that is her choice. She must understand that "you" aren't doing anything to her baby----his actions are doing it to himself. If he was released from prison about a year ago, then I assume he must be on parole/probation. Stealing money, identity theft & stealing pain meds are all parole/probation violations. All you have to do is give his parole officer a call & tell him what your brother has been doing. Let the parole officer know about how your mother will lie for him to protect him, and you are calling in an effort to prevent your brother from bankrupting your mother. If you have documents to prove what he has done, you can show them to the parole officer to support your statements.

He is her sole caregiver now---who took care of your mother before he was let out of prison? Did any of her kids have financial POA? Did any of the kids know the contents of her will?
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Quite often the one that has assumed the daily 24/7 responsibility for the aging parents get the blame from the less attentive siblings with suggestive friends and sometimes in-laws that has an eye on assets . Sibling and family love is sometimes lost forever when a full and accurate knowledge of the situation is not done/understood and a mercenary situation develops usually by an in-law.
Example== An aging family with 4 children. # of the children marry and move away but one moves in with parents or builds an apartment on their home in order to care for them. Both parents go through memory loss /Alzheimer's and all other medical problems with only one 24/7 they can depend on and sometimes maybe 1 or 2 times a year a visit from the other 3 with grand kiids they have baby sit and diapered over the years. Sun sets in the West for Pap and Granny and the mercenary /vulture syndrome takes over and the other 3 want to kick out the 24/7 care giver that has dedicated their life to Mom and Dad out of the home and split the assets. Let the family get an older analytical minded person for advise. The 24/7 person has earned the home and a share of the other assets that has been saved by not paying nursing home and other cost . Unc Bud
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I would find out her "home" bank branch. If you are able to go in and speak to the branch manager, explain to him/her the simple facts of the issue and concerns. If you have dates or transactions, show the manager. They are, by law, to report any suspicious activity on their elderly customers accounts. At any rate, the bank can flag her account.
You not being the POA runs into some difficulty for changing anything but at least you put the bank on notice. Therefore if anything occurs you will have a documented visit to the bank regarding this fiduciary elder abuse suspicion.
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Talk to simeone that deals in Elder Abuse. Social Services.
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If she is mentally competent, there is no much you can do. Being the "baby" of a family of five, I know I got extra treatment, but nothing compared to what my mother did for my one and only brother. He took advantage of her too, but I got an order of protection against him for smoking in her house, he was evicted, but because I left the state I didn't get the notice to appear in court, and the case was dismissed. It woke him up though, he soon moved out, and then died about one year later from lung cancer. I always think there is justice from above for people who take advantage of others. But, you can do nothing unless you can prove he is abusing your mother. Remember, fathers and daughters, mothers and sons have a bond stronger than anything...
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