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Mom is early-to-mid stage mixed dementia, 90, and still likes to read fiction and non-fiction. Even though she retains precious little and cannot discuss the book with you, reading provides her a great deal of in-the-moment pleasure. You can hand her a book she finished the week prior and not recognizing it, she'll start reading all over again! (Brings me a smile). Mom is cognizant of her condition and wants to know more about Alzheimer's and dementia in general. Should I furnish Mom with a book or two on this topic? I'm thinking yes, depending on the book. I don't want her take away to be a sense of hopelessness and would also steer her away from graphic content concerning the advanced stages of the disease. Has anyone else had a loved one with dementia who asked for books about dementia? Opinions pro or con about how to respond are welcome, but especially reading recommendations for appropriate books about dementia/Alzheimer's for the sufferer. Love this forum. I don't feel so all alone. Thanks to all.

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No doubt about that, AmberA. (hugs)
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Sunnygirl, I'll consider very carefully before giving anything to Mom. Thanks
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I'd be careful of assuming that a person with dementia would be able to appreciate an inspiring story the way a person who does not have dementia would be able to process it and appreciate it.

I'd discuss it with her doctor, first.

If she is unable to procure a book on her own accord, then, I'd be super sensitive of providing her with something that could cause her fear. Regardless, of how compelling a story is about a person who had dementia, the outcome is the same. They do not have a happy ending and that could be overwhelming for someone who is already struggling with so many emotions.
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Thanks to all for your thoughts. Freqflyer, I do respect your doubts about providing dementia patients info about their condition. That being said, I just got through reading an interesting nonfiction book called "Before I Forget" written by husband and wife team B. Smith and Dan Gatsby. After B. was diagnosed with early-stage Alzheimer's, she and her husband became advocates for Alzheimer's research and flew all over the US giving speeches, etc. B. remained active in this joint effort for years, fully aware of her condition and its inevitable progression. To tell you she didn't experience depression or fears about her future (at that early stage) would be false; in fact, even during part of her mid-stage, she understood what she was battling. Wouldn't she have experienced these negative feelings, informed or not? Sometimes, as in Mom's case, there is fear in the unknown. Mom wants to know what's going on. At this stage in her condition, if I protect her from this knowledge, her paranoia will likely make her think I'm "hiding" something from her. Mom is still able to articulate that she fears the unknown more than she does the hard facts. Perhaps some thoughtfully chosen information would be helpful to her. Jeanne, I'm already looking for a novel featuring an Alzheimer's patient that might fill the bill. Maybe she needs an example of someone with dementia making the best of his or her remaining years. Barb, I just read a synopsis of your book recommendation and it sounds great! I'm going to get it for Mom. Thank you all! (Everyone please keep sending book recommendations. All are welcome!)
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Your mom might love a graphic novel by Rob Chastain called Can't We Talk about Something More Pleasant? Not about dementia per second, but the struggles of an adult daughter with her very independent and quirky parents.
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Amber, I really like the idea of giving your Mom a book with dementia in it. I'm thinking a novel, rather than a medical or technical book. Not a book "about" dementia but one where that is just a fact about one of the characters. For example, every now and then some character in a novel will have diabetes. She'll excuse herself to take insulin before a meal, or his wife will keep reminding him about testing his blood sugar. I relate to that. Diabetes is just a fact of life for some people. Target stores use children in wheelchairs to model clothing in their ads sometimes. Most of us like to know that there are other people like us in the world.

But I don't have a book to recommend. I've come across maybe 4 novels that do have a character with dementia, and I related to the caregivers, but they weren't books that would be uplifting to people who had the disease. But all you have to do is find one -- and give it to her over and over. :-)
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Personally I wouldn't give a person who has dementia a book about dementia. It could become information overload and the person might think they have gone into the next phase because of one tiny thing. Or scare them about the future.

Even though I don't have dementia [I don't think] anytime I forget something it spins me into thinking I have dementia or the start of it. And that becomes scary. There are times I wished I didn't do so much studying about this disease but I wanted to be ready for my parents to understand what they were going through.
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