Follow
Share

Our long time live in aide (24 hrs/7) has been with us for going on 5 years now. Every year around the anniv of her start date I have tried to offer some incentive such as taking out a workmens comp plan, paying her cable bill, a 3% salary increase, paying her time and a half for major holidays. (This is in addition to room/board and all food covered and vacation pay every year.). Now that mom has become more needy with her demenita the aide has been passing comments in somewhat of a joking manner that "You will have to pay me more to do all this for you all day". (Such as reminding her to not slouch in her chair, being asked repetitive questions, etc.) Granted mom is needier than when she first started 5 years ago, but these comments are beginning to make me feel uncomfortable. My family feels she should not be making such comments and that she is paid enough at this point and that no more raises should be given. That the 2 week vacation pay at her upcoming 5 year anniv of her start date should be plenty in light of all the other perks. So I was just wondering how other caregivers and families/clients/agencies handle this issue of raises, clients who become more challenging to the aide and also comments about being under paid. My brother thinks that perhaps she is being greedy. I am concerned about burnout about her being there 24/7 with someone with dementia that is worsening. In the past she was not interested in taking weekends off. Perhaps a hear to heart talk is needed now.

This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.
Find Care & Housing
If you have a caregiver who works 7 days a week, 24 hours a day and you trust her and have employed her for 5 years she is worth keeping. If the responsibilities of the job have changed in these 5 years (as your mom's health has deteriorated) she should be compensated. Time and a half for major holidays and a yearly raise aren't perks or incentives they're expected as part of a job. If her hinting around gives you the impression that she is expecting more pay then you'll need to figure out what to do and then discuss it with her. A yearly bump in pay in completely appropriate especially under these circumstances. It sounds like you struck gold with this caregiver. Don't lose her.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

If mom is low income, look into VA Aid & Assistance or Medicaid waiver program. You should give a raise each year, especially if the caregiving duties are increasing. Realize that at some point the aide will burn out and leave, so look at other options, like Assisted Living or Nursing Home care. Five years is a long long time.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

It is hard to opine without the details, but overall there is a starting market rate, for individual caregivers. An individual caregiver typically makes less than what an agency charges because the agency takes a cut and provides other services such as back up for vacation or sick days and insurance and payroll. Additionally the room and board caregiver qualifications and duties also should factor into the rate. Yes, if her duties are increasing a raise may be appropriate. Someone who has been with you for 5 years should be making 10% to 15% more than the starting rate for an individual caregiver, inclusive of the new duties.

Also, if mom starts requiring active overnight care, a live in expects to sleep, so you may need to have additional help,
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.