What's the best way to handle Mom talking in her sleep?

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My Mothers has started talking out loud during her naps as if she was dreaming. It's very wierd. Sure she's got early Dementia but even on her good days (knowing the date, time, place, etc.) she's been talking out about others that are nowhere near us. She's so disoriented on these days. I reassure her as much as I can once she's awake but scratch my head about how to handle it better. Any ideas or is this just another chapter during her journey?

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According to the book "Sleep" by expert Carlos H. Schenck, MD, sleep-talking by itself is not physically harmful to the sleeper, and no cure is available or needed. If it is disturbing to a sleep partner, that person may wear earplugs, etc. Also, what is said during sleep is not meaningful -- that is, it doesn't indicate anything about the person's beliefs, desires, etc. (That a married man talks about another woman, for example, is not proof that he is unfaithful or wants to be.)

If she develops night terrors, sleep walking, or starts acting out her dreams by moving her arms and legs, that may need some treatment, but just talking isn't, apparently, significant. (And you don't have to have dementia for it to happen!)
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It could be a unrinary tract infection if this is sudden, sounds like it.
My Mom laughs and babbles in her sleep, I think she has invisible company sometimes. As long as she is happy, go with it. Good luck
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My father talked in his sleep, often quoting scripture. Sometimes he would wake up and quote scripture. This would be in the dark of night. We didn't do anything. It was weird, but it just happens. We learned after he died that he had mixed dementia. I don't know if it was a symptom of the dementia or if he became more spirit-filled when he slept.

Unless you mother starts to have terrors, I wouldn't worry too much. If her dreams become too stressful, you can talk with her doctor about them. He/she may be able to prescribe something to calm her if she needs it.
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