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Mom's 30+ year old stove needs to be replaced. She has had a gas stove all her life. Last week she tried to heat her coffee in a ceramic mug on a burner. There were three of us home with her! She went into the kitchen for just a few seconds! Yesterday she put a pot of soup on and forgot about it until smoke was pouring out of the pot. She turned off the flame and opened the door of the house to get the smoke out, but she still had a very dangerous situation. The gas to the stove has now been disconnected.


We are limited on the choices we have because the width is limited to a 24 inch opening between the wall and the stainless steel counter.


I have two thoughts on a stove replacement.
1) Replace with an ELECTRIC stove. Put in an inline On/Off switch so that we/caregiver can turn on power to the stove when we need it and turn it off again when we're done.
Problem: The burner remains HOT long after it is turned off.


2) Replace with another GAS stove. Newer ones have electric ignition. I don't know if this would be confusing enough that she wouldn't be able to start it on her own.
Problem: I don't think an inline On/Off switch would be possible because of pilot lights and ignition.


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I also appreciate all the additional suggestions… knobs taken off the stove, microwave with twist dials (she actually still has an older one with a twist dial, but I just learned that the new ones don't go back on after you open the door, so THANK YOU!), toaster oven, talking to a contractor about an inline switch for gas, AL facilities with electric stoves… all VERY helpful suggestions. A HUGE THANK YOU!!!!
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Thank you all. Not having a stove is not an option. My brother and sister-in-law are Mom's main caregivers, and they live in her home, too, and need a range to prepare everyone's meals.

The gas line is now capped. The question was what to get to replace the gas range… another gas range or an electric one. 220 is already in the kitchen for the dryer (I know I'll need a 40 or 50 amp breaker instead of the 30 amp) so I think we're going with an electric range. Thank you for your help!
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no stove. a microwave a counter top steamer, and a toaster oven only appliances that time themselves off
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I take the control knobs off my electric stove and hide them whenever I'm not using it. So far, this has worked well for us.
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The AL facilities that offer a small kitchen have electric stoves in them...safer than gas with an open flame.
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I agree with Windy....call the gas company and have them shut off the gas line to the stove. Get the new induction single burners that you can touch.....should be on sale after Thanksgiving! Just let the old stove stay.
Maybe try to find a second hand microwave or a new one that cooks with the twisty dial rather than punching buttons. I did the old fashioned one with my father for awhile...I put 2 options marked with white tape for reheating a plate or a small frozen meal. Good luck,,,,,but they all seem to have stove/microwave misadventures with dementia and I have the molten tupperware sculptures to prove it! :)
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My suggestion is no stove. You've already come close to disaster. Maybe just a microwave. My folks have a scary old gas stove. Dad has dementia but mom never leaves the house so I don't worry too much. If she were to go into care or die I would have to disconnect the gas. No way I'd leave with that thing. He'd burn the house down the first day.

BYW, The switch idea would be a little complicated and expensive for gas or electric. You would have to have it done by a qualified electrician and/or plumber. It would involve installing a large electrical and gas pipe relay device. It would solve the problem only if caregivers remember to turn it off each and every time it were used.
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I would buy one and just make sure the on/off knobs come off easily enough. Hide the knobs and get them out to use each time. A microwave and easily be misused, setting time too long will cause all sorts of problems. Sound like someone will have to keep an eye on her every minute. Maybe an electric teapot that turns itself off?
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How much are you using the stove now? I would consider not replacing it at all, rather making due with the microwave and a small counter-top oven, some of them can roast and bake pretty much anything. If you want a totally safe cooking surface you might try an induction burner, they are pretty cool. (ha ha, they are cool both literally and figuratively)

If you want/need a full range then I think electric would be the best option, with gas there is the whole issue of gas burners being turned on without being lit, yikes! I've read where others take the nobs off to keep the burners from being turned on, or you could just flip the breaker on an electric range, no need to do any fancy wiring.
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A newer gas stove burners will also remain hot for awhile. I have one.

I'm wondering if you could contact a plumbing/heating contractor that services gas stoves and ask if an in/line switch could be installed. I think I'd rely on a contractor as opposed to a salesperson; this is a technical question that might not be within the knowledge of a salesperson.
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