What are the best options for transportation for seniors who can't drive?

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Such as to the grocery store, social engagements, etc ? I know there are programs that offer transportation for medical appointments, but I understand they are limited when it comes to catering to a specific schedule. What are the best options for those who have limited mobility, can't get to a bus or train station, and don't have family members to drive them around? Any information on specific companies/agencies that serve seniors and your experiences good/bad would be helpful. Thank you.

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In the vicinity of Austin, Texas there is an organization named Drive-A-Senior who has a large number of volunteers. Seniors can sign up with them for a couple of rides per week, as needed. Some are round trip to appointments, others are one way going to a church, recreation activity, etc., and another one way trip home later in the day. I think that they are affiliated, at least loosely, to Meals On Wheels.
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Check out GoGoGrandparent - it's an automated hotline that let's folks use Uber and Lyft without a smartphone. It worked pretty well for my grandma after she fell, she couldn't drive.
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Lassie: At 64, the OP should be able to drive. That's way to young to give up driving. My mother gave up driving at age 87.
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City Access, local city will have senior vans, Sometimes Yellow Taxis too. Some places like Kaiser may offer transportation. Some assisted living places have that service. When you call Yellow Cab, do tell them you are wheel chair bound, so you need that extra care from the driver. It's best if you have someone to go along with you.....
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I disagree, you are not a lesser human being for not wanting to drive and 'lose your independence.' It certainly can't hurt to learn how to get around. Not all of us can, should, or even want to drive Our Very Own Cars everywhere like good 'muricans. Even in the past, I owned a car, worked downtown, but downtown was a fustercluck of hair-raising traffic, near misses and danger in bad weather (5 months of the year) so I gladly took public transportation to get to work... (I must put in here: of course now there are cutbacks, cutbacks everywhere ! "No Money! No Money! We is going Broke!" Now people out here are lucky to get 2 buses running in the morning to go elsewhere and perhaps to the downtown hub to transfer to another bus to go to the mall or whatever. And lucky to get 2 buses running in the evening to try to battle your way back home!) If you live in a better area in a bigger city, on a bus line, you are lucky, especially if you give up your car for safety and convenience sake. Just have a bus card, or the right change, get on, have a seat, good to go.
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I wouldn't familiarize yourself too much with taking buses, public transportation. And why? At only 64, you really don't want to lose your independence too early.
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Kathy1951 -- Familiarizing yourself with public transportation is a good idea. On my doctor's advice, I voluntarily stopped driving in my mid 70s after an oncoming driver totaled my car. (No one in either vehicle was injured.) The transition to finding alternate means of transportation was not an easy one.
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I have started using public transportation on purpose where I can (I am 64yo) so that it will be familiar to me when I am old. Bus rides or light rail from airports into cities, Uber, Taxi, bike and bus, whatever I can. I think of it as an investment in successful aging. My Mom never used public transportation of any kind, not really even a taxi, and was never willing to take it up to try. Thus she went from clinging to driving to needing a paid companion with not even medivan or a taxi in between. No ability to adapt.
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kathy1951 -- I love your story about your meeting the 90 year old "neat old woman . . . who had moved to a condo she had chosen for its access to a bus line, one a route lined with stores she wanted to use." In my previous post about the county transport van I use here in Florida, I forgot to mention that in addition to the county's door-to-door van service, my garden apartment is a few steps from a bus stop that provides service to small shops in one direction and a Wal-Mart in the other. It's free because I'm over 80.
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Check with elder's town's Council on Aging. They should have van pickups.
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