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Such as to the grocery store, social engagements, etc ? I know there are programs that offer transportation for medical appointments, but I understand they are limited when it comes to catering to a specific schedule. What are the best options for those who have limited mobility, can't get to a bus or train station, and don't have family members to drive them around? Any information on specific companies/agencies that serve seniors and your experiences good/bad would be helpful. Thank you.

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In the vicinity of Austin, Texas there is an organization named Drive-A-Senior who has a large number of volunteers. Seniors can sign up with them for a couple of rides per week, as needed. Some are round trip to appointments, others are one way going to a church, recreation activity, etc., and another one way trip home later in the day. I think that they are affiliated, at least loosely, to Meals On Wheels.
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Check out GoGoGrandparent - it's an automated hotline that let's folks use Uber and Lyft without a smartphone. It worked pretty well for my grandma after she fell, she couldn't drive.
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Lassie: At 64, the OP should be able to drive. That's way to young to give up driving. My mother gave up driving at age 87.
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City Access, local city will have senior vans, Sometimes Yellow Taxis too. Some places like Kaiser may offer transportation. Some assisted living places have that service. When you call Yellow Cab, do tell them you are wheel chair bound, so you need that extra care from the driver. It's best if you have someone to go along with you.....
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I disagree, you are not a lesser human being for not wanting to drive and 'lose your independence.' It certainly can't hurt to learn how to get around. Not all of us can, should, or even want to drive Our Very Own Cars everywhere like good 'muricans. Even in the past, I owned a car, worked downtown, but downtown was a fustercluck of hair-raising traffic, near misses and danger in bad weather (5 months of the year) so I gladly took public transportation to get to work... (I must put in here: of course now there are cutbacks, cutbacks everywhere ! "No Money! No Money! We is going Broke!" Now people out here are lucky to get 2 buses running in the morning to go elsewhere and perhaps to the downtown hub to transfer to another bus to go to the mall or whatever. And lucky to get 2 buses running in the evening to try to battle your way back home!) If you live in a better area in a bigger city, on a bus line, you are lucky, especially if you give up your car for safety and convenience sake. Just have a bus card, or the right change, get on, have a seat, good to go.
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I wouldn't familiarize yourself too much with taking buses, public transportation. And why? At only 64, you really don't want to lose your independence too early.
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Kathy1951 -- Familiarizing yourself with public transportation is a good idea. On my doctor's advice, I voluntarily stopped driving in my mid 70s after an oncoming driver totaled my car. (No one in either vehicle was injured.) The transition to finding alternate means of transportation was not an easy one.
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I have started using public transportation on purpose where I can (I am 64yo) so that it will be familiar to me when I am old. Bus rides or light rail from airports into cities, Uber, Taxi, bike and bus, whatever I can. I think of it as an investment in successful aging. My Mom never used public transportation of any kind, not really even a taxi, and was never willing to take it up to try. Thus she went from clinging to driving to needing a paid companion with not even medivan or a taxi in between. No ability to adapt.
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kathy1951 -- I love your story about your meeting the 90 year old "neat old woman . . . who had moved to a condo she had chosen for its access to a bus line, one a route lined with stores she wanted to use." In my previous post about the county transport van I use here in Florida, I forgot to mention that in addition to the county's door-to-door van service, my garden apartment is a few steps from a bus stop that provides service to small shops in one direction and a Wal-Mart in the other. It's free because I'm over 80.
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Check with elder's town's Council on Aging. They should have van pickups.
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I met a neat old woman once who had moved to a condo she had chosen for its access to a busline, one a route lined with stores she wanted to use. She got herself a small push cart which resembled a walker, and most days had an errand to run. I met her on a bus in Seattle on a day when she was 90 and going out to get doilies for a party she was having that week. Awesome in my opinion. She gave up driving because it was not worth the risk to others.
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Mom had home caregivers stop in every day and they took her to doctors appointments, and offered to take her to the dollar store or grocery store if she wanted. As the dementia advanced, of course, mom didn't want to go with them anywhere ("oh, no, not now, maybe I'll drive to the mall later tonight", though I had taken her car keys long ago) or she would forgot where she wanted to go in the first place! She went downhill really fast, so it wasn't a big concern. The aide or myself would take her to the doctors and then McDonalds, and that was a full day. Just my experience...I read that someone sold his mother's car after she stopped driving and used that money to arrange transportation as needed with a local taxi company . His mother could call, get the same driver(s), and not even need to pay as an account had been set up.
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In the Capital area of Texas (Austin), Meals on Wheels sponsored a group now called Drive-A-Senior, which posts transportation needs on the internet and via e-mail. Qualified volunteers then review what rides are needed and sign up to take folks to their appointments, visit in the home of do small small chores. They also sponsor a once a month 'Grand Adult Day' at one of the local churches. This is a morning of games and social activities, followed by a healthful lunch. Check with your local churches as well as the Meals on Wheels organization and maybe you can be the catalyst to get a similar program underway in your area.
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I agree with the suggestion of Uber or Lyft. That is what I'm trying to set up with my mom. Much, much less expensive than cabs and I've had very courteous drivers. You rate them after your ride so they do their best to keep good ratings. I'm not as familiar with Lyft but Uber drivers are required to have significant insurance. Also, unlike cabs, the Uber and Lyft systems know where the car and you are at all times. Totally "on call."
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Excellent full range of responses above. I want to add that you need to inquire about timeliness and where the person needs to meet the vehicle. My MIL lived with us for a time and used a walker. We were on a corner on a bit of a hill. Lots of steps in front, but only a slight curving slope on the side driveway. The City sponsored senior ride service only picked up at the curb and sometimes were not very timely. In her (our) situation MIL could not see the side curb from the house as she was quite short so she would wait at the curb, sometimes for 20 to 30 minutes. It didn't work well in her situation.

Ask your neighbors and a local Senior Center, or call City Hall. You may need to try several things. Perhaps you will find one service works well for church and a trip to the market during the day and with specific times, and another for social or evening events.
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One question to ask anyone you hire for this service: What is their insurance coverage?
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Another thing to consider is the mental status of the client. A person with dementia may not be able to plan ahead and arrange a ride, or even be ready at the right time. If dementia impacts the senior's ability to track day and/or time, arranging for a ride will not work.

Consider how the company does pick up. Do they knock at the door, or just wait at the curb? Do they help carry bags or purchases inside? Will they help with any mobility equipment? (i.e. walker or wheelchair.)

A home care helper is a good choice for transportation for people who need assistance with planning, being ready, and mobility assistance.
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Many home help companies will drive elders to appointments, grocery store etc. I've got one set up for my folks and its costs $18 to $25 per hour depending on the job at hand. It ranges from simple welfare checks to full in home nursing care.
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Where I live (Michigan) many counties provide transportation for specific communities, buses with wheelchair lifts. If there is a senior center where your senior lives, they might be able to provide transportation or direct you to a service that they know is reliable. Also, contact your local Area Agency on Aging. They will know of other sources. The person I use to transport my dad charges a minimum $50 for the medical appointments and he waits with my dad. He also adds on a per mile charge as well. Before you sign on for a service, interview the person who will be driving. I went through four different services before I found the one I'm using now.
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Where I live in Florida, van services are provided by the county for people who do not have their own transportation and are physically handicapped. Check with the passenger's county. Although I am not physically handicapped, I qualify under the Americans With Disabilities Act, ADA, for the services by being 80 or older. Appointments are needed. If the passenger wants to travel with a companion, a doctor must certify that one is needed.
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Here in MA if you live in a city that has public trans then they offer what called "the ride" for people with disabilities.. It will pick you up and drop you off for $10..
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The public transport service in our are has handicap accessible buses that offer a regular ride to major stores. You can also or could "dial a bus" and be picked up at your door.
There are also retired volunteers that make themselves available for longer trips through RSVP
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Try a ride share service such as Uber or Lyft. The drivers undergo a background check. There is no need to schedule them ahead of time or guess when you need them to return to pick you up. The app is very easy to download on a smart phone and use. The cost is less than a cab. It provides the ability to go where you want when you want without needing a vehicle. All payments are electronic so there is no need to carry cash. They accommodate service animals as well. I am seeing an increasing number of older adults using these services. Often a child or grandchild helps them put the app on their phone and maybe shows them how to use it one time. After that the person uses it whenever they need it! It helps to restore their independence and can less the load on family and friends.
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In my area the local public transportation service has a division that caters specially to the disabled. They can travel w one companion. The companion's ride is free. The passenger ride is around $5 each way. It is a shared ride service but works pretty well. In my area the transit service is Metro, the division for those needing help is Metro Access and Starz Vans service. Go that route your local transit authority or check your local center for the aging.
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What we ran into with mom is that she wanted an "on call" chauffeur. What the chauffeur offered was a regular day and time for trips at $25 per hour. Other trips with a week's notice were OK if they fit his availability.
She also thought she was not going to have to pay the hourly rate for him to wait for her while she was at the grocery. She was wrong.
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