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I have searched for months and can't fine a portable CD player that I think my LO who has significant dementia can operate. She can barely operate a very basic tv remote. I know she will get confused and frustrated with most CD players that have various options. Even those for children, seem to complicated. I have been looking mainly at those for kids. Do you think she would be embarrassed to be seen with that kind at the ALF?

I find it odd that no company seems to have addressed this need. I want just a portable CD player with on/on, play, ff and repeat. I'm not sure why that isn't available anywhere.

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Aw that is such a shame for your cousin. I have the silver cd player right by my Dads corded phone. When I telephone him I say look at the silver machine next to this phone and where it says play just push that button. It works most days until I get to his flat. He has no interest in TV anymore only music so it is important to him.
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That sounds great Lorraine. My cousin wasn't able to follow those kinds of directions. I wish she could, as she loves music. I have to rely on the facility to put music on for her.
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I bought my father (who is 85 and has dementia) an Alba CD player with radio in silver from Argos. Then I cut out small bits of paper with PLAY AND STOP on and stuck them right next to the corresponding buttons with an arrow pointing to them and covered the rest up. It worked great.
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That Bose sounds like a winner. I think that the stage the dementia patient is in impacts what devices they are able to use and enjoy.

I actually started this thread last year around this time. I ended up getting my cousin that Sony Walkman and she enjoyed it for a couple of weeks. Then she took a downward turn. We had to place her in a Secure Memory Care facility and she never was able to use the Walkman. The Walkman was lost during her move.

She isn't able to handle anything like that now, however, for her birthday next week, I'm getting her a regular radio to go on her nightstand. I'm going to see if one of the staff at her memory care unit will turn it on in the morning and out at bedtime. I know she will enjoy the music, but she doesn't have the ability to remember what to do with a radio.
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i'm thinking about the Bose soundwave iii for someone i love with Alz. just put cd in the slot and it goes. music turns off when you touch anywhere on the unit, turns back on when you touch anywhere on the unit a second time.
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Ginach,
The Lakeshore suggestion was perfect. They have the most basic CD player I've found. OMG. I'm so excited. I may just go with it before Christmas. I think she can operate that one.
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Thank you all for such great suggestions. I will check them out.

For right now, I decided to go with something very simple for my cousin who's in AL. I got her a Sony Walkman Radio. It's old style and has just on/off, station dial and vol. It's lightweight and she can clip it on her waistband and use it as she sits on the patio or in the visitor rooms. We'll see how that goes.

For Christmas, I'll revisit the CD player idea or even better a DVD player. She can't follow movies, but I think she would enjoy concerts of her favorite artists on DVD.
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My son has autism and needs a basic CD player. We have used one from Lakeshore the educational store. They also have a catalog and website. The CD player is meant to be used in the classroom so it is sturdy and a basic brown and black design. The buttons are large and easy to handle.
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That CD players is only available used. My kids have a Sylvania Portable CD Boombox with FM Radio (Black) which is only $25 and works fine, simple controls too. You can write the symbols on the top in a silver sharpie if they are not big enough to see just on the buttons.

Musicandmemory.org uses ipods and earphones to reach dementia patients who are no longer communicating with the outside world. They have a documentary trailer on their site which is really exciting to watch!
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Check amazon for: Sony CD Boombox with Digital AM/FM Tuner (Red)
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I agree with Kazzaa. A radio. With knobs and not buttons. LOL
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Also you can now get cordless headphones that she can listen to the radio? My aunt got one and uses it in the bath! this would be quite easy for an elderly to use just radio!
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I have an OLD sony walkman mum bought it for me for my 21st, I kid you not! ive just never gotten around to anything new and it works as good as ever i look after my things (cant help it im virgo). Mum has no problem with this as i get her the talking cds in the library and put on the phones i tried with stop/pause/rewind but a waste of time but she will just listen until she falls asleep then she tells me what she remembers of the story and i rewind it for her! mum is still ok to read but shes not reading as much now so she was delighted with this!
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You make some great suggestions. I have looked online, without much luck.

I'll keep looking and check with the ones you suggest.. I want to give it to her for her upcoming Birthday.
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Back in 2003 I bought one for my father that was just a simple one, a round device slightly larger than the size of the CD. I used labels to mark the controls.

I think it was an RCA player but it's been so long that I don't remember. And unfortunately I-Pods are all the rage now.

You might try electronics stores specifically, not the big box stores that cater to current whims, but stores that focus more on a variety of electronics.

Another option would be to search online for suppliers of assistive devices (like Sheldon Medical Supply) and contact them to see if they know of anything. You could also call local DME suppliers and ask if they can guide you to a portable CD player.

Occupational and physical therapists also have catalogues of various assistive devices. If your LO gets therapy, you could ask them. Or perhaps call your LO's PCP or the doctor who's treating her for the AZ.

The Alzheimer's Assn. might also have some suggestions, or perhaps the Area Agency on Aging, which in SE Michigan hosts Caregiving Expos annually at which a lot of device manufacturesr and/or distributors have booths.

I honestly don't think she would be embarrassed by using a children's type CD player; it might be that she would just think it's a pretty color.

Sadly and unfortunately, manufacturers look to the larger markets for their products, not those who might be a smallar market but still need something useful. It's all about targeted marketing and $$$$$.

Good luck.
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