Should I become a CNA?

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I'm really struggling with the idea of going back to school to become a CNA. I have the opportunity, and it would mean more school on my resume, which means more job opportunity and right now I am out of work. The problem is I care for my handicapped mother, and I don't like it. Not because of the responsibility, but because of the emotional pain between me and my mother. She is narcissistic and emotionally abusive, which I'm not strong around. I take care of her because she is in constant pain. I think I would be a good CNA because I've cared for my mother for over 20 years and am no longer squeemish about things, but I don't know if I could stand caring for someone who might end up having a personality like my mother. If they were a sweet patient, I would probably love the work and feel maybe some true sense of rewarding work. I'm normally a secretary and haven't found any work in nearly a year. I'm just torn between not knowing if the work would be truly rewarding or would it be a reflection of the hell I go through with my mother. So, if I have a bad relationship with my mother, does that mean I'm not cut out to be a CNA?

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Here is a great article about becoming a CNA Do You Have What It Takes To Be A CNA? 4cnas/DoYouHaveWhatItTakesToBeACNA.html
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Part of being a CNA is the ability to tune out the emotional reaction to a difficult patient, called detachment. If you can detach and remain professional you can do it. Knowing you can detach at the end of the shift and go home helps keep you sane. Now, in caring for a family member, there is no end of shift. To stay sane, though, you detach when they go to bed, or you go to work, or you go out with friends. You learn to set the problems aside and live within the joy of the moments you have to yourself. That is how you survive. Nobody can do it 24/7 for very long without burnout. When Mom is abusive, you can walk out. A CNA has to finish her shift.
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