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On another post I reached out about my mothers paranoia. The Baker Act was suggested. i have looked into how it works and it sounds like something of a last resort. My question is, what happens if she refuses to go peacefully. What happens after the 72 hours is over. I would hate for her to return to her home angrier than she left. Is placement an option they provide after the evaluation?

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I have never done this with an older person. I did have to commit my husband's cousin....3 times unfortunately. She is schizophrenic. It is not fun. We would have to fill out paperwork...needed 2 people who said she was a danger to self and others. Then the police picked her up and transported her to the psych facility. After the 72 hours we had to appear in court (the hardest part) in front of her and testify why we thought she was a danger. The judge decided if she had to stay. With this cousin, she was ordered to get treatment in the facility and out when she was released for a period of one year. In the facility they regulated her meds until she was level, then she would go home. She is great at taking her meds and has only had issues when a major life stresser came up. In the situation we were in it worked great. Not sure how it works with elderly.
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Sunnygirl1 is exactly right about officers coming to remove someone using the Baker Act. They were very nice with my Dad. The first time, they talked to him quite awhile and felt he was agreeing to act appropriately, but they hardly got around the corner, and he started in again being agressive towards my Mom so we called again. The second time, they were still very nice, but they told him in no uncertain terms that he was going with them, and he was going to see a doctor and other people in a hospital, to get help, and that he could go get in the car with them, cooperatively or they could handcuff him and put him in the car. He asked if he was being arrested and what he did wrong, and they said that he could not throw things at his wife, even in his own home, so YES....he was being taken even if against his will to a hospital. He did calm down and go with them cooperatively after that. But of course, he didn't understand any of it....or the reason for it....he just understood that they were the police and they were telling him he had to go.....
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Sonsolo,
If your case meets the criteria, it might be a good move, but, I would first consult with an attorney in your jurisdiction. I'd explore other options such as Guardianship, which might be more appropriate, depending on the circumstances. Even if you don't want to be the Guardian, you can request that someone else be appointed.

Does she wander? Does she threaten to harm herself or others? I'd make a list of her issues and discuss it with an attorney who can explain the procedures and what might likely happen. I say go with whatever will work.

And about your question above about what if she refuses to go with the Baker Act? She will be taken by law enforcement if they are directed to bring her in. It's not an invitation.
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SonSolo, I wanted to add to my post... in case you go this route....my Dad was NOT happy about having to go live somewhere else, but he adjusted nicely because we kept saying it was ordered by the doctor; because he needed to be admitted there (like a hospital....) so that these people could give meds that would help his brain work better (worked for him, because he knew for years he had dementia and was very concerned that he keep his brain working, until, obviously it stopped working well enough for him to be home....so this explanation worked to keep him happy....) At times after the first couple weeks, he asked when he would be able to go home, and we would just say, 'The doctor comes again on Tuesday, or next week etc...and he would soon forget that info. But after the first several weeks, he didn't seem to remember he had ever lived anywhere else, except with his parents as a kid. He ultimately thought he was living in a boarding room, and going out to work every day and coming back to eat dinner and stay there! we just listened to the story. He grabbed this out of his brain, because as a young man during the depression, he often had to stay as a boarder somewhere to get work out of town and earn money....Just sharing his adjustment, because it does go easier than it seems it's going to in the beginning....when you must place someone..... I was amazed at how fast he forgot that he had a home with Mom and just accepted that he was there and she lived elsewhere and came to visit him every day.
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Thanks for all of your answers. This is all stil going on, so coming back periodicall to read responses does help. Bless you all.
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I have not "Baker Acted" a parent, but I have done so with a child (she was 19, so I am not sure that quite qualifies as a child..but still) It was HORRIBLE...but I would do it again in a heartbeat if I needed to. She spent 2 weeks in a psych ward and came out of that through the court system..pretty sobering for a kid whose biggest problem was that they were being a huge brat. (Continual suicide threats and manipulation along with drug abuse....) (I must add that she is now a 29 yo professional woman with a very high paying, responsible job--sooo, it can be OK).
My mother SHOULD have had this happen to her many years ago. Instead of facing life and getting help, she retreated to her room, locked the door and had her GP simply supplying pills of all kinds. Back in the day the pharmacy delivered. She'd answer the door just to take the bag and go back in her room. I have no idea what she was on----we'd take her meals to her door and leave them. If we went inside, good chance you'd get the dinner tray chucked at you.

This was the dynamic I had, growing up. This was "normal". She was semi functional about 25% of the time, and then just for show. Suicidal all the time, but NEVER acted on it, so I doubt that was legit.

Yes, daddy was around, but he was trying to keep his company together and raise 6 kids. In frustration once he had me quit my PT job, cut back my college hours and be a Stay-at-home SISTER to my 3 younger sibs.

Looking back---I wish dad had taken her to the hospital and left her there. We're all screwed up. Of course, 40-50 years ago, what really was available besides guilting your kids into submission.
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My husband was taken to the hospital last year under the Baker act. He was violent and I had the police here two days in a row. After an hour our hospital called and said they weren't equipped to take care of a patient with dementia. I had to go pick him up and take him home. He is now on medication and calmer. I have tried to get him in assisted living, but he is too far advanced and in the late stage of dementia. The VA hospital has a one year waiting list here, and the Rehab /nursing home won't take him.....so I'm stuck. He does go the the COA daycare program 3 days a week though which is a God send.
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Firefly, it is very hard when the parent is strongly independent. Most times they are not Baker Acted, they fall and break a hip, or they burn the house down, or are badly hurt in a motor vehicle accident. They are brought to the ER and never go home again. Our mom fell and hit her head. She did return home, but was never alone again and never drove again. She really hated "staring at the four walls" and moved to AL for the social aspect. She said it was better to walk into AL than be carried into a Nursing Home.
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I know how hard it is being a caregiver but I can't even imagine how hard it must be for the person who is made to accept our help. Every day we force our loved ones to "do this" or "do that" for their own good. We yank them out of their homes and into Nursing Homes, etc., and tell them it's for safety's sake.... That said, the Baker's Act is there to be utilized for extreme situations. I hope you continue searching for other answers, especially if this is pertaining to dementia. People's environment and how others relate
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In Arizona, when this happens, during the 72 hour old, the person is evaluated by a psychiatrist and psychiatric caregivers. At the end of the 72 hours, a judge must rule as to whether the person is capable and able to return home or must be placed in a facility. In my Dad's care, the determination was placement, and I think this is the most common determination for the person's safety. Sometimes for the safety of others in the home. We had to immediately find a place that would accept Dad, and he stayed in the psych hospital until placement was arranged. He never went home again after that.
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Yes, they have. Go up to the Search Site box and type in "baker act" and you will see many Q&A
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