My Aunt (92) has starting talking to her dead parents. Is this normal?

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she has COPD and CHF. Sharp at times, but am noticing some confusing starting.

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My grandma saw my grandpa who had passed near the end and my other grandma saw her mom before she passed also...with my SIL in hospice they say a lot of people see their deceased relatives, and I beleve its them providing comfort to help someone cross over, maybe to ease transition?
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My husband saw a dead relative very early in his dementia, but not later. It might be an end-of-life phenomenon, but not necessarily.
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My mother has conversations with my deceased father. She looks at his picture and tells her all the things that are on her mind. She knows he is dead, but she finds comfort in talking to him. I asked her if talking to him made her feel like he was there with her. She said yes. In her case it is not delusion or hallucinating. I understand what she is doing. My father was deaf in his final years, so his picture hears as well as he did. :)

I have also heard about people who are near death getting visits from departed loved ones. The instances I've heard about were brief encounters, with the loved one appearing at the door and maybe calling for them. I've also heard of people having brief encounters with a stranger. I've always wondered if it might be the angel or a harbinger of death.

Anyway... what your aunt is doing is not unusual. If she finds comfort in it, perhaps it is a good thing.
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In fact, I read somewhere that even one's deceased pets are there for you.
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My uncle began calling to his deceased grandmother, talking to his dead wife, and he passed on a few months later. I believe there are loved ones on the other side who assist the ones that are passing on. Sure is a nice thought, isn't it?
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HOspice is a great place to start.... They will access her and determine if its the right time. Just call and talk, they have a great team, from nurses, doctors, people to help care for her , clean her, and even a chaplain who will come in a spend time. I cant say enough nice things about these wonderful people.
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Is she on Hospice? Is she at home or Nursing home? It could be some dementia or it could be that she is nearing the end of life. I've never seen that before, but I bet there are those here who have and perhaps can give you more information. I have read about it.

Usually, Hospice workers are very familiar with end of life behavior so I would suggest that you discuss it with them, but if they aren't involved you might consult with her doctor or health care team. Hopefully, you'll get some responses here.
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