Can an attorney bill my parents for hours spent not with them, but with their POA?

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My parents' POA had long discussions with my parents' Attorney, shared emails, and reviewed documents....but it was all initiated by the POA, it was NOT at my parents' request.
Now they've received a bill for just under $2200, and the Attorney expects it paid.
However, they will not say specifically what was discussed, just "the POA" in general. They did itemize a few general things but again, none of it was at my parents' request.
Is this right, wouldn't they have to disclose more about the discussions, if they expect my parents to pay for the bill?

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My parents have no cognitive dysfunction. They wanted the eldest to be POA only because it was traditional....but they have always had me help and advise them with buying cars, their current senior living home, medical questions, everything, but made the eldest the POA only and simply because they are old-fashioned and wanted the oldest to be both POA and Executor.
It's really difficult now, too, since the POA's spouse has recently been diagnosed with terminal cancer, and (see my other question here on agingcare) they have told me (successor POA) to step into their shoes for the during cancer treatment and after she dies until he is all done taking care of that.
So now, I guess I have an "opportunity" to find out a little more about what all has been going on, in secret, and hopefully open my parent's eyes to what has been done, and double-check if that is really what my parents want.
Perhaps it is a godsend, that I can take a peek into what I dearly wanted to find out. I hope all is well with their finances and any other decisions or changes the POA may have enacted.
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If your parents are still of sound mind, they have every right to know what they are paying for and is the responsibility of he POA to provide that information to them and to ensure the cost of this consultation is in their best interest. GraceH, I applaud you for wanting to be proactive, but a lawyer is legally bound by the confidentiality to their client and a POA is not duty bound to provide information to a thrid party only to the principle. I have DPOA for my mother who is of sound mind. I would never call her attorney for needed information without consulting her. I have only utlized my POA once so far and that was with my mothers full understanding and permission. If you feel the POA has gone beyond what is in the best interest of your parents, taking them to a new attorney to discuss their best options is an excellent idea. I understand you wanting to protect your parents. What I do not understand is what protection do you need when it comes to the current POA? Are these not your parents assets that need to be protected?
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I cannot find out what the conversations are about, because I am not the POA, and the attorney will not talk to me. When my parents asked what the bills was for, the attorney (hearing this thru my parents) said it was just some needed conversations and would not elaborate on the topics, which is very suspicious to me.
I am trying to be as pro-active as I can, to help my parents, but they are totally "stuck" on the idea that the oldest child "gets" to be the POA and Executor.
I do not want to force my ideas on my parents, I feel that would be wrong, so I am not going to go take them to another attorney and get the POA changed.
But I think it is time for me to hire my own attorney, so I can discuss what I can do to protect myself, and what reasonable actions I should do, to protect my parents from a possibly-nefarious POA.
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palmtrees1, some see POA and Medical proxy as honors, and perhaps in some sense they are. But they are also a heavy responsibility and can be a helluva lot of work.
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GraceH, if your parents are of sound mind I have two questions #1 what was the conversations about and #2 why dont you take them to a lawyer and change the DPOA immediately? Trying to not pay a lawyer will just cost more, even if they call or send a letter its correspondence/phone call fees, insane I know but true. Good luck, keep in touch.
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I was so pissed when my crazy mother appointed my brother poa medical and financial, put him on her banking accounts, made him executor of her will and who knows what else. I was so hurt that they excluded me. Just like when I was a child. He was the golden boy, could do no wrong. Now, I am so happy, especially when I read all of this.

She did me a d*** favor.
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A good POA would indeed discuss activities with the parent. But if the parent has some memory loss or other cognitive problems they may not always remember that by the time the bill comes. Sigh. Being a good POA is not always as straight-forward as it sounds like it should be.
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A good POA, however, would tell their parents everything that happened with the attorney and not keep it to himself/herself. That shows good faith. I discussed everything with my mom as her acting POA so she would understand (to the best of her ability at that time) that I had only her best interests at heart.
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GraceH, I think we all assume that the consultations with the attorney were not to set up the POA. That was done prior to these consultations.

Transparency is not required of the POA. It would be, in my opinion, an extremely good idea, especially since the two of you should be working together on your parents' behalf. But not telling you about what he is doing is not illegal.

There is a very simple solution to this issue (or so it seems to me). If your parents are not satisfied with your brothers actions and regret appointing him POA, they can change that. Would you like to be the POA? Is there someone else who would be willing and your parents trust?

Who should be POA is your parents' decision.
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And anyhow there is NO connection between an attorney and a POA document after the document is signed, there is no ongoing obligation between the attorney, unless the Principal(s) desire it to be so. You don't even NEED an attorney to draw up a POA document, it only needs to be notarized.
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