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But, people aren't accepted for admission to nursing homes unless they have the needs for the skilled nursing at the nursing home, her Mom does not sound as if she has those needs. Is that not true?
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Medicaid doesn't pay for assisted living facilities in most places. You would have to look at nursing homes. Medicare doesn't cover either. Medicare covers 21 days in a rehab.

People who are in assisted living, are paying for it themselves. I would look at decent nursing homes.
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Your mother is mentally competent and does not want to move out of her home. You should fully utilize what help Medicaid will provide in terms of home health, and consider supplementing with private help from another home health agency for bathing and showers. Have the frank discussions with Mom about what is going to happen in the next few months. It has to happen and it is coming, but not straight from this rehab stay from what you say. Even if you try to maximize your reports of what she cannot do and you cannot do, I don't think she is going anywhere but home this time. This month, identify an AL which takes Medicaid and get her to agree to a move there, even if you have to endure more time in her own home. There will be a period of private pay and spend down as she will have to "sell" the home so there is paperwork on the business end to do, (sale of home, contract with assisted living) so you need the DPOA which you may already have. Most of all you have to stay persistent on the conversations with Mom which indicate that she has to move.
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I agree with tacy022. I would ask for an assessment and be present to ensure they are realistic. I would be clear that you cannot take care of her daily needs. You are working 6-7 days per week. To take care of all of her needs, besides a little outside help once per week, is rather unrealistic, especially, if she cannot get around unassisted.

I'd be frank about what the situation is. I would stress that she can't cook, do laundry, change linen, bathe, buy groceries, and that she is mostly immobile. I'm not sure sure how they think she's able to live alone. However, if a family member is there to say that they will do all those things for her, they will likely rely on your word.

I know that when a senior falls and is unsteady on their feet, has poor balance and continues to push it, then more fractures usually follow. They must know this too. I would ask that she apply for any and all benefits, including Medicaid, and see what she qualifies for.
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You can call her medicaid casemanager if shes on waiver and they can meet both of you at the facility and do a needs assessment. If i were you, i would be at the meeting because sometimes the elderly lie about what they actually can do for themselves. They may be able to provide more care
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My mom may be discharged next week (1/24) from the rehab place to go back home where she will be by herself.
I can't believe they think she is going to be alright alone & not fall (again) because she is still very unbalanced.
She has been in rehab for almost 3.5 weeks now but her she still uses the wheel chair to get around & on occasion will use the walker to go a very short distance to the bathroom (from her bed).
I asked the head nurse if anyone will come to see my mom at home & she said she'll probably get a visiting home aid once or twice a week who will stay for a few hours a day to do light housekeeping, prepare meals, etc.
But that's it??
What about her day to day care like bathing, physical therapy etc??
They know I work all day & into early evenings so I can be there w/mom for a lot of the time so how can they allow her to go back home when she's clearly not strong enough??
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Much depends on how she does in rehab. Assisted Living is covered by Medicaid, but not in all states. Talk to the discharge coordinator and the social worker about her progress or lack of it. It's too soon to tell what level of care she will need.
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