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In recent weeks leading a complete 24/7 delusions. Has since had him evaluated and has been at the moment temporary placed in a mental facility for treatment with no conclusions to why so quickly he went for fully capable of life to my able to see any reality working toward a successful treatment for full recovery. PTSD is the major medical impact I his life . But it looks like a very long stay up too 200 hundred days + I don't want him to co recovery and come out with losing everything sure to bills have to paid home, cars, everything.

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My husband had multiple strokes and his ability to make decisions is gone. I may need to stop working to take care of him. What do I do to make up for the money I will be losing? I am so stressed out. I don't know where to turn.
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Has he been tested for a UTI? This can cause hallucinations in older people. One of my relatives was particularly susceptible.

As to the PTSD, do you know what the triggers were? Sometimes sounds, photos, similar incidents can cause a psychotic break for war veterans. If you can think back to what happened before the delusions started, that may help the staff treating him.

In the meantime, begin taking inventory of his assets, obligations, etc. so you have all the contact information you need if/when you do have to take over.

Are you holding any account jointly with him so that you can pay his financial obligations while he's evaluated?
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I agree, a POA is critical for both income tax and any stock you ay have. What I'd like to know is how you approach your loved one, spouse in my life, about the need for signing o POA.
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Jenniferashlee: Do you need to get DPOA? That way you can handle his finances, e. g. pay his bills.
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Depending on where you live, you can petition the court for an emergency guardianship with the ability to access his bank accounts to pay his bills. There is a waiver for court costs if someone is unable to pay them. This is held in the probate court. Check with his attorney and see what safeguards he has put in place. You may already be appointed with a DPOA. Best wishes for his speedy recovery!
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You mention PTSD - is he a veteran by any chance, and if so, are there services from another agency nearby, like a VA? I have found that mental hospitals seem to be too self contained, so instead of helping someone recover and rebuild bridges and connections, they treat the person as if it was all in their head, and they don't study situations outside the hospital, but try to fix the head, inside their facility. It may be that he needs a break, extensive rest and some help, but I think it is worthwhile to go and talk with others in his world or environment, tell them as best you know, of what led up to the break. See if you learn of any other support services, what alternatives are there. We seem to accept the mental hospital because we are glad someone will take them and take responsibility - but no one place has enough resources to replace a life, so no matter what, you would learn more of his world and find any options for you to be able to help him join and find support. Read online, about his condition and what you think is worrying him, and get ideas. Good for reaching out here.

I did the above for my disabled brother - and kept the focus on his adapting in the world, not just on discussing feelings, but building connections. I guess you are helping your husband - if he's above 65 or so, you might visit senior or assisted living homes - I always sought a place with an informal access for my brother, to walk to - where he could sit and have coffee - having a regular, familiar place to visit is important to many men. It's not easy to help, and it's important that you also note and solidify your own supports and places where you feel comfortable! In the end, my brother's physical abilities declined, and at that time I put him in a nursing home - but the focus on helping him in the world helped him a lot, and he walks weekly to church and the library from the nursing home on flat land. He also gets transportation to a Brain Injury program, where they help him build skills and stamina. Good luck, it's an important effort, with some downs, but the person appreciates someone who finds a way to be loyal - even while taking care of themselves.
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Is he beyond the point of being competent to assign a POA so you can be responsible for his financial affairs? If he is, you may want to petition the courts to become his conservator or guardian -- whichever is needed -- so you can take care of his affairs for him. That way when he comes out his life will be waiting for him. It sounds like something has caused him to have a psychotic break. I do hope they find there was a reason for it, and that the reason can be fixed.
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